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OS X Lion to Drop 'Rosetta' Support for PowerPC Applications

Soon after Apple released the first developer preview version of OS X Lion back in late February, we noted that Apple appeared to have dropped support for Rosetta, the system that allowed Intel-based Macs to run applications written for earlier PowerPC-based systems.

Apple of course made the transition to Intel-based processors five years ago, and Rosetta is an optional install under Snow Leopard, but some users are still hanging onto old PowerPC applications that either have not been updated at all or have updated versions to which the users do not wish to upgrade for one reason or another.

With OS X Lion now on its fourth developer preview version and a public release set for next month, it is clear that Rosetta will not be making an appearance in Apple's next-generation Mac operating system, finally leaving those legacy applications out in the cold.


As Macworld notes today in trying to help a user hoping to hold on to an old PowerPC version on Quicken, users who wish to upgrade to Lion while still retaining compatibility with their old applications will need to get creative.
Broadly, you have a couple of options. One is to create a dual-boot Mac -- one that can boot from two volumes. One volume contains Lion and another runs an older version of the Mac OS. When you need to spend some quality Rosetta time, you boot into the older OS. And yes, this is a pain.

The other option is to simply not update to Lion. Your Mac will continue to work just as well as it does today. How acceptable this is to you depends on how desperate you are for Lion's features and iCloud (some of iCloud's features will require Lion).
Macworld also suggests the possibility of running Quicken for Windows either in Boot Camp or using virtualization software such as Parallels or VMware Fusion. Quicken is a particularly interesting case given Inuit's recent revamp of its product line that has essentially left the Mac platform without a current equal to the Windows version or even earlier Mac versions, a move that has left many longtime Quicken users hoping desperately to keep their old Mac versions going.

And of course one final option is to simply abandon use of the old PowerPC applications and find substitute offerings that will run natively on Intel-based processors. Ideal substitutes may not exist for all software, particularly specialized titles, and thus users will have to weigh the pros and cons of each solution.

After five years of offering Rosetta as a solution to allow users to keep running PowerPC applications on Intel-based machines, it is no surprise that Apple has finally made the move to discontinue support. Apple's decision does mean, however, that some users will finally have to make decisions about how best to move forward with the current architecture.

Top Rated Comments

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41 months ago
The switch to intel has been going on since 2005.

I hate to break it to some people but its probably time to upgrade.
Rating: 23 Votes
41 months ago
I'm intrigued - is there much PPC only software still out therE?
Rating: 9 Votes
41 months ago
Believe it or not, my office still uses Appleworks.

With this news, we are finally making the transition to Pages.

Thank you, Steve Jobs.

P.S.

In a conversation with a "Genius" at the Apple Store, I was told that (the employee) too used Appleworks - albeit to save his passwords into. He figured that if his info was ever stolen, almost nobody would be able to open a .cwk file.
Rating: 9 Votes
41 months ago
I can't see why they don't just allow people to download the Rosetta files if needed, like currently in SL - that way, it doesn't take up space if not needed, but can still be used if necessary.
Rating: 8 Votes
41 months ago
Goodbye Marble Blast gold ... :( haha.
Rating: 8 Votes
41 months ago
I'll miss Diablo 1 + 2...

...but that's ok, 3 isn't far (hopefully ;) )
Rating: 7 Votes
41 months ago

I think it was a bad idea for Apple do drop a bomb shell like that. Honestly Apple should of give at least 2 years noticed so companies and enterprise which tend to move slower have noticed but then again this is why Apple sucks in the enterprise market.


I think anyone using Rosetta got 3 more years than anyone should have expected. Apple supported this far longer than I thought they would have.

Can something obvious happening really be called a "bomb shell?"
Rating: 7 Votes
41 months ago
Freehand users (like me) are crying now.
Rating: 7 Votes
41 months ago
Farewell to UT99... wait, wtf? NO: farewell LION.

Apple should have Rosetta. I can live without Lion. I can NOT live without the dozen old programs I continue to use, and I'd rather not spend $2500 for new versions after $29.95 for a buggy OS that won't be consumer ready until late next year.
Rating: 6 Votes
41 months ago
It sure is cOLD around here.

http://www.macrumors.com/2011/02/27/mac-os-x-lion-drops-powerpc-emulation-adds-quicktime-pro-features-much-more/
Rating: 6 Votes

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