Got a tip for us? Share it...

New in OS X: Get MacRumors Push Notifications on your Mac

Resubscribe Now Close

No 'iTunes In The Cloud' for United Kingdom Until 2012

Music licensing agreements will keep iTunes In The Cloud and iTunes Match out of the hands of UK iTunes users until "at least" the first quarter of next year according to a spokesman for the Performing Right Society, a UK-based organization that represents composers, songwriters and music publishers in that country.

Quoted in The Telegraph, that spokesman said negotiations with Apple were in a "very early stage," and that parties were "a long way off from any deals being signed." A music executive at a major UK record label said "no one expects to see the cloud music service live on this side of the pond until 2012."

Vice president and research director at Forrester Research told The Telegraph "the UK arms of all the major record labels are biding their time and waiting to see how the service affects download sales in the US before they sign up to anything."

The wait for iTunes In The Cloud will be similar in other international countries. For comparison, it took 8 months for the iTunes Music Store to go international after it launched in the United States in October 2003. iTunes Stores in France, Germany and the United Kingdom opened in June 2004 with a further EU expansion following in October of that year.

Top Rated Comments

(View all)

43 months ago
OMG SOMEONE IN A DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION WANTS TO LISTEN TO MUSIC! STOP THEM!

These are the same companies that have signed the deal in the US. It's this sort of crap that got the record companies in the position they're in. The US gets stuff 6 months to a year before the rest of the world, or course people download stuff illegally, they want to see it before the spoilers are all over the internet! There's no logic in not being able to watch or listen to something because of a border.
Rating: 32 Votes
43 months ago

...let the "this is such BS" etc. rants from the Europeans start...


And rightly so? Why can't apple negotiate in several countries concurrently?
Rating: 23 Votes
43 months ago

...let the "this is such BS" etc. rants from the Europeans start...


You expect Europeans to just smile at this news? :rolleyes:
Rating: 15 Votes
43 months ago

Then again the labels can be picky swines


Pretty much sums up the UK record industry.
Rating: 9 Votes
43 months ago

Lame indeed. Once again the UK lags behind everyone in just about everything. Glad I emigrated.


We who remain are too. :D
Rating: 9 Votes
43 months ago



Europeans complain too much. Do you see Americans bitching about not having spotify? Not so much. Why? Because in America we don't have the same feeling of entitlement that has been plaguing Europe for decades, although it's a growing problem in the states too, to a much lesser extent.


I have seen plenty of Americans complaining about the cheap drugs in Canada and more than plenty of American software developers complaining about cheap Indian devs.
Rating: 8 Votes
43 months ago
Similar in Japan where we got Movies in iTunes not soo long ago. Seeing the marketing slide and after that the reality is often very disappointing.
I never really understand why I'm not allowed to get Simpsons in Japan via iTunes or Hulu. IP blocked. Stupid. As long my credit card is charged they should be happy to have paying customers. But what I know :mad:
Rating: 7 Votes
43 months ago

Lame indeed. Once again the UK lags behind everyone in just about everything. Glad I emigrated.


Yeah because the first thing I worry about when choosing a location to live is the availability of software updates...
Rating: 7 Votes
43 months ago

...let the "this is such BS" etc. rants from the Europeans start...


And it isn't? Worryingly, Apple's treatment of it's non-US customers appears to be better than some other companies. - Google hasn't released Google Voice or Music or Books in the UK, and I can't remember if the Zune even reached these shores (although some might argue that was a blessing in disguise :p).
Rating: 6 Votes
43 months ago
Wait and see “how it will affect sales”?

Does this mean they actually think that a profitably large number of people buy a song, want it on another device too, and then pay for it AGAIN there, rather than face the hassle of synching it over? Thus, super-easy synching would be bad for sales? And making music simpler would not be good for sales?

Or is it really just the iTunes Match part that worries them? Do they think CD-rippers and music pirates are tech-savvy enough to get a song onto their computer, but not enough to manage the automatic transfer of that music to their other devices? And will therefore pay for the song on each device as a last resort? Thus, again, super-easy synching would be bad for sales? And getting $25/year from that strange pirate is worse than getting $0?
Rating: 6 Votes

[ Read All Comments ]