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Apple Raising iBookstore Visibility by Exhibiting at BookExpo America for the First Time

paidContent reports that Apple is looking to increase the visibility of its iBookstore by participating in the upcoming BookExpo America trade show with a booth in a "prime location" on the exhibit floor. The booth marks Apple's first appearance at the event and a rare appearance by the company at a third-party trade show, especially since its effort to essentially eliminate such participation that culminated in the company exiting Macworld Expo several years ago.
The company has a large booth in a prime location, next door to Scholastic and in the same area as major publishers including Random House, Disney (NYSE: DIS) Book Group and Macmillan. BEA's website notes that Apple will be represented by Scott Simpson from Apple's iBookstore.
Apple is not expected to make any particular product or service announcements at the conference, and is likely attending simply to raise its profile in the e-book market as it seeks to grow share competing against such major players as Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Update: A BEA representative has clarified with paidContent that Apple will not be exhibiting publicly at BookExpo America, only meeting privately with publishers at the event. Apple continues to be listed on the BEA site as an "exhibitor", but other details promoting the company's presence have been removed.

Top Rated Comments

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44 months ago
Lower prices... when I can buy the Kindle version of a book (that I can read in the Kindle app on my iPad) from Amazon for 30% less than in the iBookstore... I won't be buying many (if any) books through the iBookstore
Rating: 9 Votes
44 months ago
Apple needs three things in this market;
- iBooks needs to be readable on the desktop.
- The need to add content.
- They need to competitive with their pricing.
Rating: 7 Votes
44 months ago
I'm not confident that Apple can win this market. I'm a big Apple fan but I still prefer the look of e-Ink and the simplicity of a single purpose eBook reader.

If Apple begins selling standard format ePub books, that I can interchange between my eReader an iPad and an iPhone, I think that the iBookstore would do better.
Rating: 6 Votes
44 months ago
Maybe apple will expand their itunes application on the computer to gain access to the store, it would make sense.
Rating: 3 Votes
44 months ago

Apple uses their own FairPlay DRM on iBooks. They may be ePub files but they are locked to Apple devices.


Indeed.

Saying that ePub is a standard is largely irrelevant when everyone's using a non-standard and proprietary DRM system.

In terms of unprotected content, most of it is available in multiple formats (including .mobi which works on the Kindle and ePub which works in iBooks).

If something (unprotected) is in a format your device/software can't read, then you can convert it easily enough.

Apple needs three things in this market;
- iBooks needs to be readable on the desktop.
- The need to add content.
- They need to competitive with their pricing.


Bingo.

Apple's policies don't seem to be conducive to any of those three though.
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago
E-Ink is just a thousand times better for reading in my opinion, I think it's nice to not have that bright light a few inches from your face, especially if you decide to lay down and read for an hour or two or outside. I think there was a rumor about Apple somehow making an iPad with the ability to switch between normal and E-Ink but I don't know how that'd be possible.

Until then I'll stick with my own e-reader.
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago

Did you not read my comment? I said I don't care if you want to protect the file, but you must use a standard format. FairPlay is meaningless to me. If Apple ever goes out of business, I'll just break the FairPlay and I have a clean ePub file. No problem.

But Amazons-specific format? Never.


I don't see the difference.

If you're going to break the DRM (which is illegal), why wont you take the extra step to convert the book (which is legal)?

The problem isn't the bright LCD but the low dpi of current iPad display. As soon as apple gets the 4X resolution for iPad, it'll be as good as any e-ink display out there. Of course both displays will still have their own advantages and dis advantages compared to each other, but the huge gap in performance as a book reading display will become next to negligible once the dpi increases.


The problem with LCDs isn't really low DPI - it's the backlight.

Even with an incredibly high DPI an LCD simply doesn't work the same way as e-ink.
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago

Lower prices... when I can buy the Kindle version of a book (that I can read in the Kindle app on my iPad) from Amazon for 30% less than in the iBookstore... I won't be buying many (if any) books through the iBookstore


Yeah, well. The prices at Amazon and other ebook retailers would have been even lower, if Apple had not tried to muscle its way in by getting in bed with the publishers and pushing the agency model, which forbids retailers like Amazon to drop prices lower than allowed by the publishers.

Apple has been an evil force in the ebooks market.

Oh, and what happened to Steve Jobs' "Nobody reads anymore...?"

(I do like eInk much better for pure reading - I don't read at all on my iPad anymore).
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago

I've seen this comment so many times its laughable.

Apple DO NOT set the price of the books, the Publishers do - and the price the publisher sets is the price it sells for, not a penny more. Amazon DO NOT set the price of the books, the Publishers do. Amazon DO sometimes (but not always), add fees for things like "whispernet delivery". Stop blaming Apple or Amazon or anyone else and look to the publishers. They, and ONLY they, set the price.


Apple forces publishers to use the agency model (where Publishers control the price of books).

Amazon has been very vocal in opposing the agency model, and here in the UK and EU it's under investigation as being anti-competitive.

Due to its questionable legal status, and some publishers not liking the model overall, not ALL publishers use it (those that don't use it aren't allowed on the iBookstore)

For those publishers that do not use the model, Amazon's pricing is generally much lower than its competitors.

To say that Apple doesn't set the price is true, but it's not really showing the whole picture - it was their idea to let publishers set the price in the first place.

Amazon DO sometimes (but not always), add fees for things like "whispernet delivery".


Amazon never adds fees for delivery.
Rating: 2 Votes
44 months ago

Wow. That's gotta WAY limit your choices in what you read just for some minor visual enhancements (and I mean MINOR, like slightly better page turning animation) in the iBook app. To each his own I guess. :)

Tony


DeDRM and Calibre converts everything into a non-DRMed, readable book.

No limits.
Rating: 2 Votes

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