UK Parliamentary Bill Would Require Backdoors in Electronic Devices

British flagTechnology firms operating in the UK will be forced to install backdoors in their products and services for state surveillance purposes under proposed new laws, reports The Sunday Times.

The new powers come under the controversial Investigatory Powers Bill (IPB), referred to by critics as the "Snooper's Charter", which was published by Home Secretary Theresa May on March 1 and is due to get its second reading in parliament tomorrow. The bill is backed by a draft code of practice that would also ban companies from revealing if they had been asked to install the backdoor technology.

The accompanying draft document states that the British Home Secretary has the power to force firms to provide the "technical capability" to allow the security services to access communication data as well as undertake "interception" and "equipment interference".

The bill itself grants the Home Secretary the power to order the removal of "electronic protection", which technology experts say is another word for encryption. Internet service providers would also have to keep records of the online browsing history of everyone for a period of 12 months and enable intelligence agencies to access the data unhindered, allowing them to see every website a person has visited.

The UK opposition Labour party has warned the British government that it will derail the bill by abstaining to vote it through in its current form, which critics have called an invasion of privacy on a massive scale and a huge security risk if passed.

"The Home Secretary's Bill requires substantial changes before it will be acceptable to us," said Shadow Home Secretary Andy Burnham. "It must start with a presumption of privacy, as recommended by the Intelligence and Security Committee, include a clearer definition of the information that can be held in an internet connection record and set a higher threshold to justify access to them."

According to a 2016 Consumer Openness Index consumer survey, only 12 percent of British people said that they had a good understanding of what the bill involves.

"There are widespread doubts over the definition, not to mention the definability, of a number of the terms used in the draft bill," Nicola Blackwood MP, chair of the Science & Technology Committee, told TechRadar. "The government must urgently review the legislation so that the obligations on the industry are clear and proportionate."

In the same survey, half of respondents believed that "making personal data easier for government officials to access will also make it easier for criminals to access that data as well", while only 6 percent disagreed.

The bill's progress through the UK parliament comes at a time when Apple is engaged in a high-profile dispute with the FBI, which wants its own backdoor into the company's software to unlock the iPhone at the center of the San Bernardino shooter investigation.

Apple believes complying with the demand would set a dangerous precedent that could lead to the overall weakening of encryption on smartphones and other electronic devices. Apple is scheduled to appear in court to fight the order on March 22.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Tags: Encryption, IPB


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10 months ago
All hackers around the world must be like:



Rating: 25 Votes
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10 months ago
Wtf is wrong with these governments? I hope their devices are the first to get hacked so all their nasty secrets get published to the world.
Rating: 16 Votes
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10 months ago
Arses.

Stupid is as stupid does.
Rating: 14 Votes
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10 months ago
Teresa May coming out with the lame "paedophiles and terrorists" line in 3...2...1....

She initially wanted to ban 'encryption' before someone pointed out that would destroy all internet banking and commerce. Shows how much she knows about the subject.

Sorry luv, we know how you abuse every law you get, no one trusts you on this, either.
Rating: 13 Votes
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10 months ago
As a brit, I feel our government is a mixture of moronic and evil, and they both embarrass and terrify me.
Rating: 12 Votes
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10 months ago
Sometimes I wish folk here were as passionate about this as Americans have been.
Rating: 11 Votes
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10 months ago
This is basically going to allow surveillance without even possession of a device.
Rating: 11 Votes
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10 months ago
If one country forces Apple to make a back door, than essentially it affects every iPhone in the world.

I honestly believe (and hope) if Apple wins in the US and losses in a few insignificant countries, they will take the loss and say, screw your country, you don't want the iPhone, than you don't get the the iPhone. Because even if they win here in America, there is going to be one small country that will rule against Apple and try to ruin everything.

Also, I'm not calling the UK small and insignificant, but if this law passed, than they deserve the insult.
Rating: 8 Votes
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10 months ago
Camera on every corner. Camera in every hand.

I really wonder if Apple fails to comply, would the country actually disallow sales indefinitely. At that point it would seem like a People's Republic.
Rating: 6 Votes
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10 months ago

If you've got nothing to hide then you've got nothing to fear.


If you've got nothing to hide then grant me unrestricted access to your webcam.

Saying you don't care about privacy because you've got nothing to hide is like saying you don't care about free speech because you've got nothing to say. It's not about something to hide. It's about something to lose.

There's no question that people in many countries are imprisoned, punished, or worse, for saying, doing or believing things that you would undoubtedly consider legal and even appropriate.
Rating: 5 Votes
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