T-Mobile to Offer Accessories on 24-Month Payment Plan With $0 Down

T-Mobile today announced plans to begin offering accessories under its equipment installment plan, allowing users to purchase various iPhone and iPad accessories and pay for them over 24 months.

The equipment installment plan is available for accessories priced between $69 and $250 and does not require a downpayment for qualified customers. Customers must have a T-Mobile Simple Choice plan and if T-Mobile service is cancelled, the remaining accessory payments are due upon cancellation.

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This means you and your family could walk out the door not only with new smartphones and tablets but also with your choice of the latest audio and mobile accessories--all for $0 down and 24 monthly payments with a Simple Choice plan.

For example, you could pick up the state-of-the-art LG Tone Pro hands-free headset for $0 down and just $2.91 a month for 24 months with absolutely zero interest. You can find more information about T-Mobile's new EIP payment option for accessories at your nearest participating T-Mobile store.
On its website, T-Mobile offers a wide array of accessories, including Jawbone Jambox speakers, Beats By Dre headphones, Mophie charging packs, and more.

T-Mobile is also currently offering a deal that includes a $100 MasterCard with the purchase of both an iPhone and an iPad. T-Mobile will begin selling accessories via payment plan on Sunday, July 20.

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22 weeks ago
Debt, it's the American way.
Rating: 6 Votes
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22 weeks ago

If you can't buy it outright then you can't actually afford it. Same goes with cars, as an American I feel disappointed that people will actually go for this.


I have a 2013 Highlander that I purchased new with 0% financing over 60 months because of my excellent credit. Why on Earth would I choose to pay for it outright???
Rating: 5 Votes
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22 weeks ago
If you can't buy it outright then you can't actually afford it. Same goes with cars, as an American I feel disappointed that people will actually go for this.
Rating: 3 Votes
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22 weeks ago

If you can't buy it outright then you can't actually afford it. Same goes with cars, as an American I feel disappointed that people will actually go for this.


If they don't actually charge interest and you are planning on keeping service on T-Mobile for that long it's not a bad deal as then you can use that money for something that gets you interest or or to pay a bit more down on some other debt like a car or house.
Rating: 3 Votes
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22 weeks ago
If you can't afford a $69 accessory, you shouldn't be buying it.
Rating: 2 Votes
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22 weeks ago

If you can't buy it outright then you can't actually afford it. Same goes with cars, as an American I feel disappointed that people will actually go for this.

Buying your house in cash are you? There are tons of reasons to finance that have nothing to do with affordability.
Rating: 2 Votes
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22 weeks ago

If they don't actually charge interest and you are planning on keeping service on T-Mobile for that long it's not a bad deal as then you can use that money for something that gets you interest or or to pay a bit more down on some other debt like a car or house.


Because that's exactly what the demographic for this campaign are going to do.
Rating: 1 Votes
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22 weeks ago

If you can't buy it outright then you can't actually afford it. Same goes with cars, as an American I feel disappointed that people will actually go for this.


Learned this the hard way. Woke up one morning and wanted to be debt free. Haven't used a credit card in 3 years. Only debt I have is a house note but it will be paid off 10 years before I retire.
I'd rather drive a crappy car I paid cash for than make monthly payments on something that depreciates like crazy. And only buy stuff I can pay for upfront. Such a beautiful thing.
Rating: 1 Votes
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22 weeks ago
I have several friends who spent many years selling vehicles at dealerships, and you're *somewhat* correct, but not completely.

What people often fail to realize is that the "0% financing for well qualified buyer" promotions are often handled by the auto manufacturer. The dealership offers it, but doesn't have to build the cost of the interest into the price you pay for the vehicle, because the manufacturer covers that for them.

(So that guy who posted about asking how much less you'd pay with a cashier's check vs. taking the financing may have actually found it would be the same price either way.)

Negotiating on price is starting to evolve into something only worthwhile on used car purchases. With new cars and trucks, the dealerships tend not to make a whole lot of money on the sales directly from you "paying too much". (Yes, some dealers purposely inflate the sticker price or "pad" it with relatively worthless extras like rust-proofing or pin-striping on the hood/doors. But you can figure that stuff out just by price comparing the same vehicle at multiple dealers in town, without so much as speaking to a salesperson first.)

Most of the time though, the dealerships make the majority of their profits from the in-house financing (including things like extended warranties that the financing guy tries to sell you as you're actually closing the deal), plus money received on the "back end" from the manufacturer for making the sale.

The Internet is the biggest factor for this change.... It's just too easy for someone to get educated about a new vehicle and what it SHOULD cost. And dealers with a good price can make a sale anywhere in the country, via sites like eBay Motors, vs. only having the "reach" of walk-in customers living nearby.


That's why you negotiate the price of the vehicle and then do financing. You should never purchase a car without knowing what you're paying for it. If you're just negotiating for a specific monthly payment, you're going to get screwed.

Rating: 1 Votes
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