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Apple Has Backlog of Requests From Police to Unlock Seized iPhones

PasscodeApple has created a 'waiting list' for law enforcement requests to unlock seized iOS devices, according to a report from CNET.

The article notes a case in Kentucky where the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives was the lead agency, and investigators contacted Apple for assistance after they were unable to locate any law enforcement agency in the country with the forensic capabilities to unlock an iPhone crucial to the case.

The agency contacted Apple but was told by a representative in Apple's litigation group that there would be a seven-week delay.
The ATF's Maynard said in an affidavit for the Kentucky case that Apple "has the capabilities to bypass the security software" and "download the contents of the phone to an external memory device." Chang, the Apple legal specialist, told him that "once the Apple analyst bypasses the passcode, the data will be downloaded onto a USB external drive" and delivered to the ATF.

It's not clear whether that means Apple has created a backdoor for police -- which has been the topic of speculation in the past -- whether the company has custom hardware that's faster at decryption, or whether it simply is more skilled at using the same procedures available to the government. Apple declined to discuss its law enforcement policies when contacted this week by CNET.
While it's easy to erase an iPhone when it has been locked, for law enforcement, it appears to be considerably more difficult -- but not impossible -- to retrieve data from seized devices.

In its privacy policy, Apple says it may disclose personal information "by law, legal process, litigation, and/or requests from public and governmental authorities within or outside your country of residence" or "if we determine that for purposes of national security, law enforcement, or other issues of public importance, disclosure is necessary or appropriate."

Top Rated Comments

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17 months ago
If Apple has a way, then that is a security hole waiting for the jail-breakers to discover.
Rating: 18 Votes
17 months ago

If Apple has a way, then that is a security hole waiting for the jail-breakers to discover.


Unlikely. Apple has a ramdisk that they execute via DFU/iBoot that allows access to the filesystem, very similar to the ones used by forensic companies.

However, since the iPhone 4S and beyond, these ramdisks stopped working for forensic companies when Apple made the bootrom DFU code bulletproof (there are no exploits for it).

Only Apple can make their ramdisk work on the device because they have to codesign it with their private key AND obtain the proper personalisation signing for the device's identifiers and random NONCE. (Getting all these signatures for production devices could be time consuming without a lot of pre-existing tools to automate it. The personalisation process also varies between 4S/5/iPad 2/iPad 3/iPad mini. Normally iTunes mediates this during device restores to production iOS releases).
Rating: 15 Votes
17 months ago

There is a guy in my local mall who will do it for them for only £15...


£ and 'mall' in the same sentence - culture clash!
Rating: 15 Votes
17 months ago
One thing is for sure... The code on the depicted iPhone is 1701. Wild guess! ;-)
Rating: 6 Votes
17 months ago
Hmm...this seems a little vague:

if we determine that for purposes of national security, law enforcement, or other issues of public importance, disclosure is necessary or appropriate

Rating: 6 Votes
17 months ago
There is a guy in my local mall who will do it for them for only £15...
Rating: 6 Votes
17 months ago
ATF agents are the least scrupulous people with the most incentive to ruin your life for their own gain out running around carte blanche.

I'd sooner put my devices in a microwave or set my car on fire before I'd give them anything to play around with. I'd much rather explain to a judge why I have no trust in their "authority", and why I'd sooner see them getting shot up in whichever third-world hellhole they spend all day fantasizing they're in, than cooperate with their BS-wrangling schemes ever again.

I'd like to see Apple respect its customers privacy instead, and tell these pumped-up idiots that if they want customers data they'll have to get it from the customer, and anything they cant get, they cant get.

Apple should not become a corporate extension of the penal system, especially not such a corrupt one.
Rating: 4 Votes
17 months ago
"Backlog of requests from police" ???

Shouldn't "requests" go in the trash?

Why would Apple respond to anything other than a court order? It's too bad the sheeple don't demand that corporations stop voluntarily selling us out to the government.

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Uuuuuuh, you are totally incorrect. If there is a subpoena issued (which there would be if they are searching a suspect device) then Apple is required to provide any help they can. If they had the ability to remove the device password and did not, they could be cited with obstruction of justice and the *****torm that would cause for them. :rolleyes:


um. YOU are totally incorrect. There is a difference between a subpoena and a court order. A court order is issued by a judge, and compliance is required. A subpoena can be issued by an attorney or a law enforcement agency. Not only is compliance NOT required, but releasing non-public information to law enforcement in response to a subpoena can violate statute.

Lesson:
Court Orders should be complied with only to the letter of the law, nothing more.
Subpoenas go in the trash.
Rating: 4 Votes
17 months ago
Makes me wonder about the Filevault 2 encryption and if Apple has any back doors in it.
Rating: 3 Votes
17 months ago

Hmm...this seems a little vague:


No doubt that's intentional. "Let's give ourselves massive scope, and cover ourselves as much as possible; and hope users don't read the policy (& EULAs) and raise a fuss about the implications." I'd imagine it's the same at most/all companies.
Rating: 3 Votes

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