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HTC One Targets iPhone Owners by Offering Data Migration from iPhone Backups

Handset manufacturer HTC is seeking to streamline the process for iPhone users to switch to the forthcoming HTC One by enabling it to extract data from iPhone backup files, enabling automatic transfer of photos, videos, calendar entries and text messages to the handset, reports CNET Asia.

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Transfers will take place using a new version of HTC's Sync Manager software, which already allows music to be imported from iTunes. By adding in the ability to copy across key data, HTC removes one key barrier to switching platforms.

HTC is heavily promoting a widget-based approach called BlinkFeed, which pulls live data from user-selected social and media networks onto the handset's home screen.
At the centre of the new HTC One experience is HTC BlinkFeed. HTC BlinkFeed is a bold new experience that transforms the home screen into a single live stream of personally relevant information such as social updates, entertainment and lifestyle updates, news and photos [aggregating] the freshest content from the most relevant and interesting sources, giving it to people at a glance, all in one place, without the need to jump between multiple applications and web sites. To enable this new dynamic approach to the smartphone, HTC will provide both local and global content from more than 1,400 media sources with more than 10,000 articles per day.
With HTC bringing BlinkFeed to Android and Windows Phone banking on its "live tiles" for its home screens, competitors are increasingly looking to move beyond grids of static icons popularized for the smartphone market by iOS. It remains to be seen how Apple will continue its evolution of iOS, particularly as consumer perceptions of "staleness" compete with Apple's focus on simplicity and consistency.

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Posted: 20 months ago
I have no desire to switch, but if I did, this would be my biggest hang-up. Well done HTC.
Rating: 7 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago
Not sure why everyone's so fussed about the "live tile" or "blink feed" type of display. It's like watching a stock exchange screen or the advertisement screen at Piccadilly Circus. I'm not that addicted to Facebook that I want to see my news feed every time I touch my phone, and I sure don't want to be.

I like having icons and pressing icons and expecting them to launch a single, well defined app, instead of drawing data from multiple obscure apps, which is just confusing.

I agree that simplicity is an absolute must for a smartphone, and it should only do what I ask it to do, nothing else. It's distracting enough as it is.

I hope Apple doesn't change too much of this with iOS 7. I wish they made multi-tasking better but I sure don't want the home screen to change.
Rating: 7 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago
No thanks.
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago

Not sure why everyone's so fussed about the "live tile" or "blink feed" type of display. It's like watching a stock exchange screen or the advertisement screen at Piccadilly Circus. I'm not that addicted to Facebook that I want to see my news feed every time I touch my phone, and I sure don't want to be.

I like having icons and pressing icons and expecting them to launch a single, well defined app, instead of drawing data from multiple obscure apps, which is just confusing.

I agree that simplicity is an absolute must for a smartphone, and it should only do what I ask it to do, nothing else. It's distracting enough as it is.

I hope Apple doesn't change too much of this with iOS 7. I wish they made multi-tasking better but I sure don't want the home screen to change.


I agree, I don't get the all the "OMG iOS is stale, no new features" complaining. It's like claiming there's no innovation in spoons lately. I like it how it is thank you very much, I can get whatever reminders/notifications on the lock screen that I want. I don't want my phone keeping up to date on the weather, stocks, Facebook, etc... burning data and battery when I don't care about them. same goes for the screen size. I do think they should offer the phone parts as an option on the ipad mini for those who want it though.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago
That's nice if I wanted to switch.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago
I have an iPhone 5, but I'm still buying the HTC One. (Already pre-ordered) and it's great that HTC have stepped up the ante with some decent sync software for a change. It's been one of the main headaches for mac users with android devices (syncing) and so it's good to see some decent support.

Samsung & Sony etc, need to follow suit....
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago

I agree, I don't get the all the "OMG iOS is stale, no new features" complaining. It's like claiming there's no innovation in spoons lately. I like it how it is thank you very much, I can get whatever reminders/notifications on the lock screen that I want. I don't want my phone keeping up to date on the weather, stocks, Facebook, etc... burning data and battery when I don't care about them. same goes for the screen size. I do think they should offer the phone parts as an option on the ipad mini for those who want it though.


Ditto.
I like your "spoon" analogy.
Prior to touch screens, the click wheel on the iPod was a near perfect implementation of simplistic controls. Why change something that works great? I can't remember where, but I recall a post in these forums once about how limited choice sometimes results in greater product satisfaction - by keeping people from feeling overwhelmed by options. It was more directed toward prodcut lines rather than software, but similarities apply.
I'm all for options, by the way, but if the basic interface is intuitive and works well, I wouldn't rush to overhaul it.

That said, if Apple truly came up with something better (and not just change for change's sake), I'd be thrilled.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago

That's the thing that made me initially dislike my iPhone. I was an old Palm OS guy, and I was used to being able to get cool software of every sort, including specialty app launchers.

I spent a lot of time at first with Apple Care, trying to get the damn thing to do simple stuff, like not have all the icons on all the pages "snap to grid", so I'd be able to tell at a glance which page of icons I was on. Every time, the answer was "you can't do that".

So I asked about alternative launchers, given that Springboard was so dumbed down and incapable of the simplest of the sorts of things I was used to (what? You can't substitute icons? WTF? What? You can't change the label under the icon? WTF?").

The people at Apple Care didn't even understand my question. The supervisors were at a loss. "But that's iOS!" "No, Springboard is just an app that runs under ios. I want another app launcher instead of springboard" "Sorry, but that is impossible".

I liked my iPhone. for about 2 days. Then I realized just how dumbed-down the damn thing was, compared ot Palm Pilots of a decade earlier.


At least you tried it. Wasn't for you. You moved on. Good job.

For me it's the exact opposite.

- I want the icons to snap to grid - it's one of the first changes I make in Finder on OS X. [as an aside, if you have a lot of apps which it sounds like you did, you would probably have been much more productive using Spotlight to find your apps].
- I don't need to change the names under icons (why would anyone need that? Serious question, as for me anyway, I hardly ever even notice the text under folders and icons, the icon itself is enough to find what I need, however I'm sure you aren't trolling and have a very real reason for this need).
- What exactly did you want from an alternative 'app launcher' instead of the Springboard? Did you even research the iPhone and it's features/capabilities before you bought it? 30 seconds on Google and you could've found out this information. Saved yourself and Apple Care's time. And started enjoying your non-iPhone device much sooner. Maybe something to consider before your next phone, actually, any purchase...
- Palm Pilots, WinMo devices were all horrible experiences for me. Customisable, tweak friendly, hackable 'til the cows came home. But the experience was horrible. As was my N95 - my last phone before I got an iPhone. I've never looked back. The N95 did everything my (1st gen) iPhone could and more - but it was so poor at most of it's tasks (the camera was fantastic for its time though), slow laggy UI, clunky hardware, maps which were horrible etc.

And finally if anyone really needed these things they're all available via jailbreak (although I'm not jailbroken so can't give examples).


Regarding the article, data migration is a nice step from HTC. But not sure how much use it will get.

The Blinkfeed stuff is no use at all to me. I can't stand all this 'live updating' stuff, it's so distracting. But I know some people are big fans. I'm glad Apple have kept it nice and simple, lots of alternatives for those that think iOS is stale.
Rating: 1 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago

...
I had a lot of icons i would have wanted to label better (for me). One specific one really bugged me. It was the Boston Business Journal's app. The icon was labeled "Boston".

To me, an icon called Boston means the Boston.com (Boston Globe newspaper) website. But no, the icon labeled Boston on my iPhone brought me to the BBJ, which is what everybody called the Boston Business Journal. I wanted the icon for the BBJ to be labeled BBJ. I wanted the icon for Boston.com to be labeled Boston.

Simple, eh? Easy peasey. Basic stuff...


I agree with much of what you said (except for the Galaxy S3 - I will not buy a Samsung phone again, because of the (tacky) proprietary overlays, resulting in slow OS updates and after a couple of rounds, NO updates at all - so one is left to root and rely on the kindness of strangers for often buggy ROMs).

That aside, the icon art change and label change should be a no-brainer. I change half the art on my Galaxy Nexus -- some icons are just ugly to me, or do not go well when next to each other. I have changed labels much less often than icons, but it is frustrating that it cannot be easily done in iOS.

It is also frustrating that something as integral and personal as a keyboard cannot be changed in iOS. Because of that, there is practically no development or innovation on that front for iOS, while in Android there is a plethora of options, some far superior to the stock keyboards in either platform.

As to the jailbreaking argument:

First, why should the average user be put through it, just so they can get some basic features taken for granted on other platforms?

Second, I just jailbroke for the first time in two years (iPad 4) and the community is far less vibrant than it used to be - there is very little useful development on Cydia, other than a few copies of Android features (the multitasking launcher or a few widgets). This stagnation may be due to the greater difficulties and longer delays in jailbreaking new devices, but whatever the reason, basically, unless you want to steal $1 apps, there is little reason to jailbreak.

I get the feeling that some either don't know better, or simply burry their heads in the sand. iOS is falling behind.

The last few updates have been largely confined to effectively copying features from Android (the pull-down notifications in iOS 5, for instance, or folders in iOS 4). Even Siri was a copy of a number of "assistant" applications already available on Android, just with a bit deeper OS integration.

This is not just some rant by an Android fanboy. I like Apple. A lot. But the world is changing and even people like Wozniak are beginning to chime in:

Here is something from early 2012, even before Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean) was released last June:

STEVE WOZNIAK: ANDROID HAS LEAPT AHEAD OF APPLE IN MANY WAYS (http://bgr.com/2012/01/16/steve-wozniak-android-has-leapt-ahead-of-apple-in-many-ways/)

More ominously, from a practical standpoint, is what Ralf Rottmann, who founded the largest mobile development company in Germany, recently posted:

AN IPHONE LOVER'S CONFESSION: I SWITCHED TO THE NEXUS 4. COMPLETELY. (http://rottmann.net/2013/01/an-iphone-lovers-confession-i-switched-to-the-nexus-4-completely/)

Dismissing such obvious warning signs is simply stupid, whether you are an Apple shareholder, iOS developer, Tim Cook, or simply a fanboy.
Rating: 1 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago


- I want the icons to snap to grid - it's one of the first changes I make in Finder on OS X. [as an aside, if you have a lot of apps which it sounds like you did, you would probably have been much more productive using Spotlight to find your apps].


That's what they all say. Use spotlight. My answer is that a text-based interface is no cure for a defective GUI. Just make the GUI work well. Text based interfaces are a step backwards, IMO.




- I don't need to change the names under icons (why would anyone need that? Serious question, as for me anyway, I hardly ever even notice the text under folders and icons, the icon itself is enough to find what I need, however I'm sure you aren't trolling and have a very real reason for this need).


I had a lot of icons i would have wanted to label better (for me). One specific one really bugged me. It was the Boston Business Journal's app. The icon was labeled "Boston".

To me, an icon called Boston means the Boston.com (Boston Globe newspaper) website. But no, the icon labeled Boston on my iPhone brought me to the BBJ, which is what everybody called the Boston Business Journal. I wanted the icon for the BBJ to be labeled BBJ. I wanted the icon for Boston.com to be labeled Boston.

Simple, eh? Easy peasey. Basic stuff.

But no. Unlike every other GUI OS I have ever used in my life, it is impossible in iOS. Not difficult and ungainly, requiring excess steps to accomplish. Not as good as that, but instead, totally and completely impossible. I find that unacceptable.



- What exactly did you want from an alternative 'app launcher' instead of the Springboard?


On my Sony Clie I had several different app launchers. Of course, I used my favorite one on a daily basis, and only sometimes used the others.

One of them had really cool icons and themes and stuff and looked just great, but it didn't have many features. If you took away the ability to change icons and change themes, etc., it would have been something like the app launcher in iOS - very, very basic.

One gave you huge amounts of information, like where the app was stored (on the memory card or in the machine), with various default views and lists and alternatives and things. That one would tell you, for example, all of the files that were associated with the app, so you could manipulate them separately. I rarely used that one - it was too much information for daily use.

The one I liked had categories of icons, much like folders. You could put your most-used ones on the main page, and access a drop-down list of (self-made) categories like eBooks, Utilities, or whatever. On my 3GS, I couldn't even put the damn icons in folders! All I could do was wade through page after page of icons.

There were a bunch of app launchers for PalmOS. Some looked really cool, some worked really well, and some had lots of information and features.


Did you even research the iPhone and it's features/capabilities before you bought it? 30 seconds on Google and you could've found out this information. Saved yourself and Apple Care's time. And started enjoying your non-iPhone device much sooner. Maybe something to consider before your next phone, actually, any purchase...


If you recall, at the time, the iPhone was considered SOTA. I had heard, before I bought it, that it was "elegant" and "easy to use". I did not fully appreciate the fact that what these phrases meant was "totally dumbed down". And indeed, had I not been used to PalmOS, I wouldn't have realized just how bad it was. And to be fair, the iPhone had a lot of great things about it too.

But the basic user interface sucked really bad. That surprised the hell out of me. And newer versions of iOS are better now.

And BTW, I enjoy my Galaxy S3 is just fine.
Rating: 1 Votes

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