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Adobe Updates Flash Builder and Flex to Support Building iOS Applications

Adobe today announced the release of Flash Builder 4.5 and Flex 4.5, new versions of the company's rich application development tools that now support cross-platform mobile app development for iOS, BlackBerry, and Android.
Developers now have a single platform for building highly expressive mobile applications that can be distributed via the Android Market, Apple App Store and BlackBerry App World. Offered standalone or as part of Creative Suite 5.5 Web Premium and Master Collection, Flash Builder 4.5 enables the creation of applications that work seamlessly across leading mobile device platforms.

"The reaction from developers to the new mobile capabilities in Flash Builder 4.5 and the Flex 4.5 framework has been absolutely fantastic," said Ed Rowe, vice president of developer tooling, Adobe. "They are amazed by how easy it is to create great mobile apps for Android devices, BlackBerry PlayBook, iPhone and iPad. Companies can now effectively reach their customers no matter what type of device they have."
Adobe has also issued a blog post discussing the update and highlighting some of the applications recently built with the new tools.


Flash Builder 4.5 is available a standalone purchase in both Standard ($249) and Premium ($699) versions, with the Premium version also being included in Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Web Premium and Master Collection bundles. Flex 4.5 is a free, open-source framework.

Top Rated Comments

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45 months ago

Millions of iPad buyers have already decided.


As well as over a hundred million iPhone and iPod touch users.


This isn't a discussion about the Flash plugin, it's a discussion about Flash Builder.
Rating: 16 Votes
45 months ago
People sure get worked up whenever Flash is mentioned.

As a developer believe me when I point out:

* Developers don't care about the Flash debate directly one bit. It's about using tools that meet the needs of the project. All platforms, SDKs, IDEs, etc., have their advantages and disadvantages. It's hard enough to choose the best tools for the job, balancing short and long term requirements without thowing a lot of emontion into the decision. Flash is amost unbeatable in some areas, useless in others and somewhere in between in most. I won't even comment on Flex directly because I haven't used it.

* There are tons of misinformation in this area thrown about.

* The ability to develop apps using Flash will not reduce the quality of apps in the app store. Flash makes some things easy but releasing an app requires a lot of different skills. Flash only makes a few of them so easy "anybody" could do it. You're still going to need developer skills to release apps. There are tons of crap now and a small percentage of good to great apps. That's not going to change.
Rating: 13 Votes
45 months ago

But how else can I have my restaurant's wine list take 2 minutes to load while you listen to elevator music?


with poorly coded HTML 4

or

with poorly coded HTML 5

or

with poorly coded Silverlight

etc.

(don't confuse bad programming with bad technology)
Rating: 9 Votes
45 months ago

This isn't a discussion about the Flash plugin, it's a discussion about Flash Builder.


You think they know the difference?
Rating: 8 Votes
45 months ago
If it works, it works, if it doesn't, apps that use it will get drowned out by bad reviews. The customer gets to decide now.
Rating: 7 Votes
45 months ago

Millions of iPad buyers have already decided.


As well as over a hundred million iPhone and iPod touch users.


What, exactly, did millions of us decide about which compiler devs use to bring us apps??

This isn't a discussion about the Flash plugin, it's a discussion about Flash Builder.


They don't care; they hear "Flash " and instantly froth at the mouth.
Rating: 6 Votes
45 months ago
So he is on an Apple laptop with a nice iron man and android sticker to hide the Apple logo. :rolleyes:
Rating: 5 Votes
45 months ago

If it's "cross-platform" then that means NONE of the UNIQUE FEATURES of iOS will be usable in these conversions. Otherwise, the conversion would not work on Android and Blackberry.

Hence, Apple's argument the first time. Apps wll be "ordinary" leading users to feel that it is iOS that is simply "ordinary."

There ought to be a disclaimer for these Apps.


what unique features?
Rating: 5 Votes
45 months ago

what unique features?


Accelerate Framework. APNS. In App Purchases. Gyroscope...

Don't tell me every android phone has equivalents and the Flash IDE magically choses the right one at run time.
Rating: 4 Votes
45 months ago

Have a look at this and tell me what's ordinary about it:

http://machinarium.net

That game is made with Flash, it runs on OS X (and can even be purchased in the Mac AppStore), Linux and Windows and if Steve Jobs would listen to reason, stuff like this could also run just as easily on your fancy little iGadgets. At least now, thanks to Adobe and not thanks to Apple, there is a way for developers and designers to also port their great work to your crippled iPads and iPhones.

By the way, Flash 10.3 runs extraordinarily well on the Samsung Galaxy S2. I don't know why His Steveness is brainwashing everybody to believe that Flash performs poorly on phones. But then again, the S2 runs with an OS that was NOT designed to restrict its users and it also has a fully featured web browser.


While your post is totally off topic (since this wasn't a thread about Flash Player), I do have this to say.

Flash runs "extraordinarily well"? No, it's run better than it has on other devices so far. Have you read reviews for that device? There's still content that it chokes on, games that can't play well, etc. It's an improvement. One of the best experiences on a phone, but still marred. Battery drains are better, but it still drains battery life fast. (Much faster than HTML5 content) Only a few phones have been released that I've seen reviews that gave flash performance anything near a favorable spin, and I read them all, for every carrier. Adobe finally has some fire under their arses and they're actually trying to develop again for a change. Apple probably gave Adobe the kick in the pants they needed because it put them in a line of fire all over, not just from Apple. The last Version of flash for the Mac was a HUGE improvement performance wise, and I don't think they'd have put the effort into had it not been for the negative attention. It now a question of if they can innovate improvements faster than people are finding alternative technologies.

And you compared a flash game running on desk top os-es to mobile ones? Our Macs run flash just fine thank you. I despise when people throw a bunch of junk into a conversation that has no baring on the subject, which btw, isn't about flash player performance, but using Adobe's tools to port apps to various platforms.

The only thing I will credit you with is that Apple should let us be adults and decide if we want to install Flash on an IOS device, and not ban it like it's a narcotic or pornography. Personally, I haven't been at all bothered without it. Flash for Honeycomb has been the most stable, and functional mobile release so far, but Honeycomb is spared a lot of the fragmentation that plagued the mobile handsets. Google took a cue from from Steve Jobs with their tablet OS and locked it down a bit.

90% (from my own experience, not stating a fact) of the Apps I see people have are simple apps that a port wouldn't offer a bad experience with. Something like the USA Today app that basically is just a shell that drops a web feed doesn't need a lot of intricacy behind it. Now say something like The Sims, a game with a lot of dynamics, would fare better being more native. I think developers are capable of figuring out how they need to build their apps to make them efficient. There will always be crap apps... but not because of the tools, because the developers just want to throw as many 99 cent fart and gimmick apps out there to snag a buck and move on to the next. Lazy developers.
Rating: 4 Votes

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