Cardiogram


'Cardiogram' Articles

Cardiogram Partners With Life Insurance Company to Offer Apple Watch Owners No-Cost $1,000 Accidental Death Plans

Apple Watch app Cardiogram, which is designed to provide you with more information on the heart rate readings obtained from the Apple Watch, is teaming up with Greenhouse Life Insurance Company and Amica Life to offer up to $1,000 worth of accidental death insurance to Apple Watch owners. Cardiogram users can get the deal starting today through the Cardiogram app for iOS. The offer is available in Wisconsin, Arizona, Indiana, and Georgia, and will be expanding to other states in the future. Greenhouse Life Insurance Company, launched from RGA, and Amica Life are the latest insurance companies to embrace the Apple Watch. Health and life insurance providers have been increasingly incorporating data from wearable devices into their plans to encourage preventative care. Companies like John Hancock and Aetna, for example, provide discounted Apple Watch devices to their customers, encouraging them to be more active to improve health."Ultimately, life insurers save dollars by saving lives," said Brandon Ballinger, co-founder of Cardiogram. In multiple clinical studies, Cardiogram has validated the accuracy of its artificial intelligence-based algorithm, DeepHeart, to detect multiple chronic conditions - including hypertension, sleep apnea, diabetes and atrial fibrillation - using the heart rate sensor on consumer wearables. "This launch is a step toward using wearables to improve health. One of the first challenges we faced was to distill the complex world of life insurance into a simple set of screens that ordinary people can understand on their phones."The Cardiogram

'Cardiogram' App Update Brings Native Apple Watch Support, 3D Touch, and More

HealthKit-enabled Apple Watch app Cardiogram has received its 1.0 release, bringing native watchOS 2 compatibility, 3D Touch for supporting devices, and a redesigned interface. The app has been developed in collaboration with researchers at the University of California San Francisco's Health eHeart study, which aims to help end heart disease. The program wants to develop a way to detect atrial fibrillation – a medical condition that can lead to stroke – using innovations in everyday consumer technology. By that token, the Cardiogram developer team have been refining an algorithm that attempts to detect abnormal heart rhythms using the Apple Watch's heart rate sensors. The 1.0 version of the app at the center of its efforts brings that goal a step closer, introducing native watchOS 2 support that enables users to track and view recorded heart rate data without having to tether their iPhone. A new Apple Watch complication also allows users to quickly view their latest heart-rate readings. Meanwhile, the iPhone companion app now includes comprehensive activity statistics and trending HRM data, along with a Metrics screen that brings together users' move, stand, and exercise goals. In addition, iPhone 6s and 6s Plus device owners can use 3D Touch gestures to tag peaks in heart rate, while social media sharing and interface tweaks make up the rest of the update. Anyone with an Apple Watch can take part in the eHeart study, since the algorithm learns from its users, whether or not they have preexisting heart conditions. Apple's HealthKit framework