Vine


'Vine' Articles

Vine Transitions into 'Vine Camera' as Original Service Shuts Down

As promised, Twitter today discontinued the original Vine app and service, transitioning it into a new "Vine Camera" app designed to allow users to make six-second looping videos that can be saved to the iPhone's camera roll or shared directly on Twitter. Videos posted to Twitter from the Vine Camera app will loop like they did in the standard Vine app, but aside from allowing users to capture and edit looping video, no other Vine features remain. Existing Vine videos can be downloaded from the Vine website, and all Vines will continue to be available on the Vine.co website, though no new content can be uploaded. Twitter first announced plans to shut down Vine in October of 2016. The company entertained multiple purchase offers for Vine but then decided to maintain a simpler version of the app that's now known as Vine Camera. Today’s app update, the Vine Camera, lets you keep making Vines & posting them to Twitter, where they now loop! 🎥— Vine (@vine) January 17, 2017 The Vine Camera app, which has a new icon, can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link

Twitter Transitioning Vine to a Simpler 'Vine Camera' App

Twitter today announced that rather than shutting down the Vine app entirely as planned, it will be transitioned into a new app called "Vine Camera." Vine Camera will allow users to continue to make six-second looping videos that can then be saved to the iPhone's camera roll or shared directly on Twitter. No other Vine features will remain. The Vine app will also be updated with a new feature that makes it easier for Vine users to link accounts to transition from Vine to Twitter, with a tool for allowing Vine followers to follow Vine users on Twitter instead. Existing Vine videos can be downloaded through the Vine app or the Vine website, and all Vines will continue to be available on the Vine.co site. Vines will be available for download through the app until the transition is made to Vine Camera. Twitter first announced plans to shut down Vine back in October. Twitter allegedly entertained multiple purchase offers for Vine before deciding to create the Vine Camera

Twitter May Sell Vine Instead of Shutting It Down

Twitter last week announced plans to shut down Vine, but it looks like the video sharing service could potentially live on as Twitter is currently entertaining multiple purchase offers. According to TechCrunch, Twitter is vetting term sheets from several companies who are offering to buy Vine and "hopes to make a deal soon." Its not known which companies have made offers for Vine, but one rumor suggests Japanese company Line is in the running.One source says that at least some of the offers are for under $10 million, indicating Twitter might not generate significant revenue directly from selling Vine. However, Vine could still benefit Twitter even if it's owned by someone who would help it thrive and retain the strong integration between the two apps. Vine content plays instantly in the Twitter stream, bolstering its current parent company's quest to serve more video that could attract user engagement.First introduced in 2013, Vine lets users capture six-second-long looping video clips that can be shared on social networks like Twitter and Facebook. Vine has had some stiff competition in recent years from companies like Snapchat and Instagram, leading to Twitter's decision to shut it down. Should Vine not be sold, Twitter plans to shut it down "in the coming months." The Vine website will remain intact so Vines will continue to be available to watch and download, though no new content will be able to be created. Vine's demise comes in the midst of significant layoffs at Twitter. In October, Twitter let go of nine percent of its staff, or 350 people, in an

Twitter Shutting Down Vine

Twitter today announced plans to shut down Vine, the video sharing service it acquired in 2012. Twitter plans to discontinue the mobile app "in the coming months," but did not give a specific timeline. Introduced in early 2013, Vine allows users to capture and share looping video clips that are six seconds in length, sharing them on various social networks like Facebook and Twitter.Thank you. Thank you. To all the creators out there -- thank you for taking a chance on this app back in the day. To the many team members over the years who made this what it was -- thank you for your contributions. And of course, thank you to all of those who came to watch and laugh every day.Twitter plans to leave the Vine website intact, so Vines will continue to be available to watch and download. Twitter promises to notify users well in advance of any changes to the app or website. The shuttering of Vine comes amid massive layoffs at Twitter. Twitter is letting go of approximately nine percent of its staff, or 350 people, as it works on cutting down on costs and restructures its

Twitter Rebrands 'Stars' & 'Favorites' to 'Hearts' & 'Likes'

Twitter today announced the impending rollout of a new "Hearts" and "Likes" system for its social network, which will replace the traditional "Stars" and "Favorites" that's been used on the service for the past few years. The company cites a "confusing" quality to the star system that causes a disconnect between a new Twitter user and anyone who favorites their tweet. The heart, it believes, is more of a universal symbol of expression and connection. You can say a lot with a heart. Introducing a new way to show how you feel on Twitter: https://t.co/WKBEmORXNW pic.twitter.com/G4ZGe0rDTP— Twitter (@twitter) November 3, 2015 We are changing our star icon for favorites to a heart and we’ll be calling them likes. We want to make Twitter easier and more rewarding to use, and we know that at times the star could be confusing, especially to newcomers. You might like a lot of things, but not everything can be your favorite. The heart, in contrast, is a universal symbol that resonates across languages, cultures, and time zones. The heart is more expressive, enabling you to convey a range of emotions and easily connect with people. And in our tests, we found that people loved it. The hearts system will also make its way to the Twitter-owned Vine service, rounding out the social networks that the company owns -- including Periscope -- with a more uniform liking system. The company notes that the new update will roll out starting today on Twitter for iOS and Android, the web, Windows 10, TweetDeck, "and on Tweets across the Internet." Other services, like Twitter for Mac, will

'Vine Kids' for iOS Launches With Streamlined Interface and Focus on Kid-Friendly Content

Six-second video sharing service Vine today announced Vine Kids, an app that skews towards a younger generation and is meant to act as a hub for kid-friendly content that may be harder to discover on the original app. In the announcement, Carolyn Penner, Head of Communications and Marketing at Vine, states the idea for the app came from a colleague's daughter and her infatuation with the video-clip sharing service. The idea came to her during Vine's "Hack Week," a period where the company encourages employees to set aside normal duties and begin brainstorming and working on brand-new ideas. The easy-to-use app doesn't require an account for a user to follow anyone else, offering a newsfeed-style curated list of six-second videos picked by the Vine team that kids can easily swipe left and right through.We’ve seen for ourselves – and heard from parents, siblings and others – that kids love Vine. So, we built Vine Kids, a simple new app that gives young children a fun way to watch Vines. Through adorable animated characters, kids can watch videos that are appropriate for a young audience. Swiping right or left shows a new Vine, and you can tap the screen to hear quirky sounds. Acquired by Twitter in the summer of 2012, Vine has seen a handful of updates over the years, slowly adding more functionality to its camera suite and social features. The Twitter-owned service met a few scandals early-on when a sexually explicit Vine accidentally became an "Editor's Pick" on the service, violating Apple's terms of service. Vine Kids is available to download for free from the