iPhone Lightning Dock

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'iPhone Lightning Dock' Reviews

Apple iPhone Lightning Dock Review: Simple Design With Broad Compatibility, but Some Stability Concerns

Apple's history of iPhone docks is rather hit-or-miss, with the company's recent designs generally tailored tightly to the profiles of the iPhones they were designed for, preventing the use of cases on the iPhones and making the docks incompatible with later iPhone designs. That changes with the new iPhone Lightning Dock, introduced yesterday a full eight months after the launch of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. The new dock forgoes a form-fitting iPhone-shaped depression in favor of a simple Lightning connector embedded in a small, slightly pliable nub to cushion the device as it rests on the connector. iPhone 6 Plus with Apple Leather Case on iPhone Lightning Dock The design has some advantages: it offers a clean and simple look and it'll fit any iOS device with a Lightning port, including many of those with cases. The lack of a recessed docking area also keeps the iPhone's Touch ID home button easily accessible while the device is docked. There are definitely some downsides, however, with the most obvious being stability. With the Lightning connector being the sole means of support for the iPhone, the device does tend to rock side to side if bumped. And while the Lightning connector is very firmly embedded in the base of the dock and does not feel in danger of being damaged, users may have concerns over potential damage to their iPhone's Lightning port if the device should happen to be bumped strongly while mounted on the dock.

'iPhone Lightning Dock' Articles

Apple's Phil Schiller Recommends Lightning Dock for Charging an iPhone 7 While Listening to Music

Apple's new iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus ship without a headphone jack, requiring customers to use either Bluetooth or Lightning-equipped headphones. Many customers who routinely charge their iPhones while also listening to music have been questioning whether that usage scenario will possible sans headphone jack, and as it turns out, Apple has a solution. In an email to a customer, Apple SVP of marketing Phil Schiller says that while he prefers to use the wireless AirPods to listen to music, customers who want to listen to wired headphones while charging an iPhone 7 can use the Apple Lightning Dock, which has a built-in headphone jack. Priced at $49 and available in colors to match each of the iPhones, the Lightning dock has both a USB input and a 3.5mm headphone jack built in, making it perfect for customers who want to charge and listen to music at the same time. Unfortunately, it's an expensive solution compared to former method of using 3.5mm EarPods and a Lightning cable, which came free with the iPhone. Belkin also just announced a $40 Lightning Audio + Charge RockStar adapter designed to let users listen to Lightning headphones while charging, but it's both bulky and pricy. To ease the transition away from the 3.5mm headphone jack, Apple is providing customers with both a Lightning to 3.5mm adapter and a set of EarPods with a Lightning connector. Of course, when using these accessories, charging is not possible at the same time. Apple's ultimate goal seems to be to transition customers to wireless headphones like its recently announced AirPods. While

iPhone 5c With Touch ID on Apple's Website Fuels Unlikely Refresh Rumors

A collection of iPhones are modeled alongside the brand new Apple-branded Lightning Dock, revealed Tuesday, on the dock's official store page. An iPhone 6, 6 Plus, and 5s are shown placed on the new dock's lightning charger port, but a mysterious pink-and-black outlier, which appears to be an iPhone 5c at first glance, upon closer inspection can be seen including a Touch ID sensor instead of a traditional home button. Rumors of a cheaper, 4-inch "iPhone 6c" model of the next generation of iPhones began late last year, backed by a few sources out of the Asian supply chain who manufacture the smartphones. More recently, however, reliable KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo claimed these rumors as false, noting that Apple will stick with 4.7- and 5.5-inch models this year. While the iPhone on Apple's website in question today could in fact be the accidental unveiling of a new iPhone 6c, it's highly unlikely the company made such a slip-up in revealing an entirely new iPhone. It's more likely a curiously egregious Photoshopping error having to do with one of Apple's website designers, and will no doubt be taken down in due time. Update 10:05 AM Pacific: Apple has removed Touch ID from the iPhone 5c render as