Bluetooth LE


'Bluetooth LE' Articles

iOS 10 Bug Breaks Kwikset Kevo's Touch-to-Open Functionality

Kwikset has announced that its Kevo smart lock's touch-to-open technology will only work on iOS 10 if the Kevo app is open and visible on an iPhone's screen, due to a bug related to Bluetooth LE peripheral mode. Kwikset said it is working closely with Apple to support a solution that will restore the functionality as quickly as possible. iOS 10 will be publicly released later today, so the fix will likely be included in a subsequent software update. In the meantime, Kwikset offers some temporary solutions for continuing to use Kevo's touch-to-open functionality:- When at your door, open the Kevo app on your iOS phone or smart device, making sure you can see the app on your device screen and touch the Kevo smart lock on your door - When at your door, open the Kevo app on your iOS phone or smart device, making sure you can see the app on your device screen, and use the app to lock and unlock the door (In Home Locking and Unlocking) - If you have a Kevo key fob, the Touch-to-Open functionality of Kevo will still workKwikset said the iOS 10 bug does not affect the security of Kevo smart locks, while the sending, receiving, and revoking of eKeys is also not affected. Update: Kwikset says iOS 10.0.2 addresses the bug. The update fully restores Touch-to-Open

Apple's Strict Bluetooth LE Security Requirements Slowing Rollout of HomeKit Accessories

While it has been more than a year since Apple launched HomeKit, a software framework for communicating with and controlling light bulbs, thermostats, door locks and other connected accessories in the home, only five HomeKit-approved products have been released to date: the Ecobee3, Elgato Eve, iHome iSP5 SmartPlug, Insteon Hub and Lutron Caseta Wireless Lighting Starter Kit. The slow rollout of HomeKit-enabled hardware accessories is not because of a lack of interest in the platform, but rather Apple's strict security requirements for Bluetooth LE (low energy) devices, according to Forbes. In particular, the strong level of encryption required to use the HomeKit protocol through Bluetooth LE has resulted in lag times that essentially render some accessories useless.For example, a smartlock that makes its user wait 40 seconds before it opens is clearly inferior to a traditional lock. One of HomeKit’s selling point is that it provides a more reliable user experience, so these kinds of lag times will need to be sorted out before Apple can become a major platform for the smart home. Elgato Eve smart home sensors for doors, windows and energy consumption Chipmakers such as Broadcom and Marvell have reportedly been working to improve their Bluetooth LE chips to more effectively handle Apple's level of encryption, an important step if the company wants to become a major player in the smart home. In the meantime, developers have either been focusing on Wi-Fi-based HomeKit hardware or working on temporary solutions to the problem.For the time being, Elgato has found a

Apple's Adoption of 'Bluetooth Low Energy' Paves Way for New Possibilities

As we noted last week, Apple has adopted new Bluetooth 4.0 chips in their latest MacBook Airs and Mac Minis. Bluetooth 4.0 notably includes the Bluetooth Low Energy specification which promises a low-power and low-latency implementation that opens the door to a number of new kinds of Bluetooth-powered devices. The best example of what will be possible comes from Apple's popular Nike+ accessory which isn't actually a Bluetooth Low Energy device. The Nike+ accessory is a sensor that sends signals from your shoe to your iOS device to track your daily runs. The information is sent from the sensor wirelessly to your iOS device where it's stored for later syncing. Nike's implementation is a proprietary one, though it is similar to Bluetooth. Bluetooth Low Energy standardizes this sort of functionality for a broad market of devices. Like Nike's shoe sensor, the new protocol promises the ability to power accessories for more than a year on a simple button cell battery without recharging. Since the technology is so new, there haven't been many product announcements for accessories with the technology. Casio was one of the few who has revealed a Bluetooth low-energy watch that will interface with your mobile phone. The device can receive notifications for incoming calls, SMS and email, and can also be used to locate your phone if its within range (~5 meters). Even with the incorporation of the Bluetooth technology, the watch will run for two years on its cell battery. Other possible uses commonly listed for Bluetooth Low Energy include: •