Apple Tag


'Apple Tag' Articles

Exclusive: iOS 13's Hidden 'Items' Tab for 'Apple Tags' Revealed

MacRumors has obtained never-before-seen screenshots of a new "Items" tab that Apple is developing for its Find My app in iOS 13. This tab is not available in the public version of the software update released today. Similar to the existing "People" and "Devices" tabs in the Find My app, the "Items" tab will display a map at the top and a list of items associated with a user's Apple ID account at the bottom. The existing "Me" tab in the Find My app will be relocated to an avatar hovering over the map in all tabs. The new "Items" tab will be closely integrated with Apple's rumored Tile-like item tracking tags, codenamed "B389" internally. By tapping the "Add" button in the tab, users will be able to track the location of items affixed with so-called Apple Tags directly within the Find My app. The tab informs users to "tag your everyday items with B389 and never lose them again," making it clear that Apple is working on a Tile competitor. MacRumors shared an image of Apple's tag from an internal build of iOS 13 last month, although it may not reflect the final design of the product. MacRumors also shared a similar screenshot of the "Items" tab last month, but these screenshots provide a more detailed view. iPhone users will receive a notification when they are separated from a tagged item, according to strings in the internal build of iOS 13. If necessary, users can then tap a button in the Find My app that will cause Apple's tag to start chiming loudly to help them locate

iPhone 11 Models Feature 'U1' Ultra Wideband Chip Amid Rumors of Apple Item-Tracking Tags

iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max models are equipped with a "U1" ultra wideband chip for "spatial awareness," according to tech specs on Apple's website, which should result in more accurate indoor positioning and pave the way for the future launch of Apple's rumored Tile-like item tracking tags. Apple explains:The new Apple‑designed U1 chip uses Ultra Wideband technology for spatial awareness — allowing iPhone 11 Pro to precisely locate other U1‑equipped Apple devices. It's like adding another sense to iPhone, and it's going to lead to amazing new capabilities. With U1 and iOS 13, you can point your iPhone toward someone else's, and AirDrop will prioritize that device so you can share files faster. And that's just the beginning.Apple's tags will also feature ultra wideband tech, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. The distance between two UWB devices can be measured precisely by calculating the time that it takes for a radio wave to pass between the two devices, with much more accuracy than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi. While the Apple Tags were not announced at Apple's event today, no reliable sources ever provided a timeframe for their release. There is plenty of evidence of the tags in internal iOS 13 code, but perhaps Apple is waiting until iOS 13.1 is released on September 30 or for a potential October event to unveil them. MacRumors shared several exclusive details about the Apple Tags last

Kuo: 'Apple Tags' to Feature Ultra-Wideband Technology, Likely Far More Precise Than Tile's Trackers

Last week, MacRumors revealed new details about Apple's upcoming Tile competitor, with internal iOS 13 code suggesting that Apple plans to release small, circular "tags" that can be attached to electronic devices, backpacks, keys, and other personal belongings to keep track of their locations. Apple Tags concept by MacRumors Now, noted Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has thrown his weight behind this rumor. In a research note with TF International Securities today, obtained by MacRumors, Kuo said he expects Apple's tags to feature ultra-wideband or "UWB" technology. As he has said previously, Kuo also expects all three 2019 iPhones to support UWB. Ultra-wideband is a short-range, low-power radio technology that is able to provide more precise indoor positioning than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi, suggesting that Apple's tags will be more accurate at pinpointing the location of lost items than Tile's current item trackers, which rely on Bluetooth LE. The distance between two UWB devices — such as an upcoming iPhone and Apple Tag — can be measured precisely by calculating the time that it takes for a radio wave to pass between the two devices, according to Electronic Design, which notes that UWB is up to 100× more accurate than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi:In practice, UWB signals are able to effectively measure distance between two devicesNo with 5- to 10-cm accuracy, compared to roughly 5-m accuracy for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. When implemented in a system of fixed beacons tracking tag locations, the locations can be calculated to within 10-cm accuracy.It is unclear if Apple's tags