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2018 MacBook Air's FaceTime HD Camera Quality Issue

After the 2018 MacBook Air launched, complaints began surfacing about the machine's 720p FaceTime HD camera, with users suggesting it was noticeably worse than the FaceTime cameras on other MacBook machines, including the 2018 MacBook Pro and the previous-generation MacBook Air. All 720p cameras are rather poor in quality compared to the FaceTime cameras that we get in iPhones and iPads, so we initially believed these complaints were coming from people who just expected more from a 2018 machine. Given the sheer volume of complaints, though, MacRumors decided to do some investigating and found that the 720p FaceTime HD camera in the 2018 MacBook Air does indeed appear to be worse than the FaceTime HD camera in some other models, specifically the 2015 MacBook Air. 2018 MacBook Air vs. older MacBook Air Compared to the 2015 MacBook Air, the FaceTime HD camera in the 2018 MacBook Air is noticeably worse. It's darker, grainier, and lower in quality. To be clear, neither camera is good because we're talking about 720p video here, but there is a visible difference in side by side photos. 2018 MacBook Air on left, 2015 MacBook Air on right Just got my new Macbook Air 2018 edition. Sadly I did not research enough and was badly surprised by the camera problems. For comparison Macbook Air 2013 vs Macbook Air 2018 photos in same indoor light. I really hope this is not the expected quality.@AppleSupport @MacRumors pic.twitter.com/hYsacjcogk— Boris Nikolai Konrad (@borisnkonrad) January 10, 2019 2018 MacBook Air vs. 2018 MacBook Pro The 2018 MacBook Air's

'Flexgate' Display Issues Affecting 2016 MacBook Pro and Later

Some 2016 and later MacBook Pro models appear to be displaying issues with uneven backlighting caused by a delicate and easy-to-break flex cable, which has been dubbed "flexgate." Impacted machines can feature uneven lighting at the bottom of the screen, which looks a bit like a "stage light" effect, and the display can eventually fail entirely. Image via MacRumors reader SourceSunToM What's the cause? According to repair site iFixit, which first highlighted the problem, 2016 and later MacBook Pro machines are using thin, fragile display flex cables that are prone to malfunctioning with repeated closing and opening of the MacBook Pro's display. The flex cables are loosely wrapped around the display controller board and when the MacBook's display is opened, the cables are pulled tighter, leading to tears and problems over time. Image via iFixit iFixit says the backlight cable is usually the one to break first, leading to backlighting issues and eventual display failure. Which models are affected? The issue can impact any 13 or 15-inch MacBook Pro model manufactured in 2016 and 2017 though it appears to be affecting Touch Bar models more frequently. 2018 models may also be impacted, but Apple did make flex cable changes to these machines that may solve the issue. Apple introduced a redesigned MacBook Pro in 2016, and this was the first to use the new flex cable. Older MacBook Pro models are not impacted because they use a more durable wire that was routed through the hinge instead of around it, mitigating the stress of repeated display openings. The

iPad Pro (2018) Bending Issue

Shortly after the 11 and 12.9-inch iPad Pro models were released, some MacRumors readers began complaining of noticeable bends in their tablets, with some of the bends appearing to be worse than others. The issue received little attention until The Verge published an article on the iPad Pro with word from an Apple spokesperson suggesting that the bending was a side effect of the manufacturing process and not, in fact, a defect. Image of slightly bent iPad Pro via the MacRumors forums Apple device bending raises major red flags with customers after the "Bendgate" issue that affected the iPhone 6 Plus, with those devices bending due to structural problems that were later solved, so iPad Pro owners were rightly confused and outraged over Apple's response. At the time, Apple's response suggested that customers would not be able to get replacements for some of the seriously bent iPads that had popped up in photos. Apple's VP of hardware engineering Dan Riccio sent out emails to a few concerned iPad Pro owners, and a MacRumors reader shared one of them. Riccio said that the iPad Pro meets or exceeds Apple's quality and precision standards and that its level of flatness would not shift during the lifetime of the product. He also said that the small variations would not affect the function of the device. An bend in an iPad Pro taken right out of the box, via the MacRumors forums Riccio's email did not mollify customers, and Apple was silent on the issue for several more weeks until publishing a support document that offered further explanation. Apple says that

'Apple Support Issues' Articles