How Tos

How to Take a Slow-mo Selfie or 'Slofie' on iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max

Apple's iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max all feature an updated 12-megapixel front-facing camera, along with a couple of notable additional shooting options that selfie fans should love. The first addition is that you can now turn your iPhone to landscape mode to capture a wider shot, which is great for group selfies. The second is a new option that lets you take slow motion videos at 120 frames per second. To market the latter feature exclusive to its 2019 iPhones, Apple invented a new word for it, combining slo-mo (the name long used for the 120fps function on the rear-facing camera) and selfie to form the word "Slofie." Don't worry, though – "Slofie" isn't used to describe the feature in the ‌iPhone 11‌'s redesigned Camera app, where it's still referred to using the more sober term "Slo-mo." Follow the steps below to create your first Slofie. Launch the Camera app on your iPhone. Tap the perspective flip button below the viewfinder to activate the front-facing camera. Swipe rightwards along the shooting mode options directly below the viewfinder until Slo-mo is highlighted in yellow. Take your slo-mo recording by tapping the red shutter button, then tap again to end it.To view your Slofie, simply select it in the Photos app and it will play automatically. If you want, you can share it straight away using the Share button (the square with an arrow pointing out) and selecting one of several options from the Share

How to Use Camera Filters on iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max

With the launch of its 2019 iPhones, Apple introduced some impressive new camera capabilities that are exclusive to the flagship smartphone lineup, such as Night mode, QuickTake Video, and a new ultra-wide lens. As a result, Apple has updated the design of the Camera app on the iPhone 11 series, which means that some of the existing photo and video functions have been moved around to accommodate the new features. Photo filters are a case in point. On iPhone XR, XS, XS Max, and earlier iPhone models, the filter options are accessed by tapping the Filters button at the top of the viewfinder. Here's how to access them on ‌iPhone 11‌, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max. Launch the Camera app on your iPhone. Tap the chevron at the top of the viewfinder to reveal the additional settings strip above the shutter button. Alternatively, swipe up on the viewfinder using your finger. Tap the Filters button (it looks like three overlapping circles) at the far right of the settings strip. Swipe along the nine available filters to choose one. You'll get an instant preview of the selected filter effect in the viewfinder. Tap the shutter button to take your picture with the selected filter applied.Note that in the final image you can see the filter icon in the top-right corner of the screen. This appears just to remind you that the selected filter is still active and ready to be applied to the next photo. You can turn off filters by selecting the first Original option in the filter menu. In addition to filters, the camera settings strip includes options to access Night

How to Use Instant Hotspot on iPhone and iPad

This article explains what Instant Hotspot is and how you can make the most of it using your Apple devices. If you like, click the links below to jump to the sections that most interest you. What is Instant Hotspot? How Does Instant Hotspot Differ From Personal Hotspot? What You Need to Use Instant Hotspot How to Connect Your Mac to an Instant Hotspot How to Connect Other iOS Devices to Your Instant Hotspot How to Let Others Use Your Instant Hotspot How to Enable Hotspot Family Sharing How to Disable Instant Hotspot on iPhone and iPadWhat is Instant Hotspot? In iOS and iPadOS, Instant Hotspot refers to Apple's long-standing Personal Hotspot feature that lets you share the data connection on your iPhone or cellular iPad with other Apple devices. Apple calls it Instant Hotspot to highlight the fact that your hotspot is always on and ready to provide internet access to any other devices nearby that are signed into your iCloud account, without them requiring a password to connect. How is it Different From Personal Hotspot? Instant Hotspot uses Apple's Continuity framework to connect other devices to your hotspot, so that it stays connected in the absence of a viable Wi-Fi connection, even if the iPhone or ‌iPad‌ hosting the hotspot goes to sleep. That means any incoming messages and push notifications will still arrive on the connected device(s). In previous versions of iOS, you could only connect to an iPhone or ‌iPad‌ personal hotspot manually, and you had to know your hotspot password, but that's no longer the case. What You Need to Use Instant HotspotIn

How to Get Siri to Announce Incoming Messages Over AirPods

In iOS 13.2, Apple introduced Announce Messages with Siri, a new iPhone feature that allows you to listen to and respond to incoming text messages when you're wearing connected AirPods or Powerbeats Pro headphones. In short, if you receive a message when you're wearing a pair of Apple's wireless headphones, ‌Siri‌ will transcribe it to you so you don't have to look at your iPhone or Apple Watch, and if you wish, you can reply to it instantly without even having to say "Hey, ‌Siri‌." Announce Messages with ‌Siri‌ is disabled by default, but you can easily turn it on by following the steps below. Note that for the feature to work, you need a pair of second-generation ‌AirPods‌ or ‌Powerbeats Pro‌ with Apple's proprietary H1 chip -- it won't work with third-party Bluetooth headphones. Launch the Settings app on your iPhone. Tap ‌Siri‌ & Search. Toggle on the switch next to Announce Messages. To reply to a message without it being read back to you, toggle on the switch next to Reply Without Confirmation.The Announce Messages feature also supports third-party messaging apps like WhatsApp. You can choose which apps you want it to work with by selecting them from the same settings screen, below where it says Announce Messages From. Just note that if notifications have been turned off for the app you choose, they'll be turned back on

How to Add Several Photos to an Album in the Photos App in iOS 13

Apple is always on the hunt for ways to make using your iPhone and iPad easier, and will often tweak the menu and button functions with each new version of iOS in order to make its software interfaces more consistent. Occasionally though, these changes can stump longtime users, and going by the number of emails MacRumors has received on the subject, that's just what a small adjustment to the Photos app appears to have done in iOS 13. In previous versions of Apple's operating system, adding some photos to an album involved selecting (or ticking) several photos in your Camera Roll and tapping an Add To button at the bottom of the interface. In ‌iOS 13‌, however, Apple has moved this facility to the share sheet. The following steps explain the new process of adding photos to an album, which should become second nature once you spot it. Launch the ‌Photos‌ app on your iPhone or ‌iPad‌. Tap Select in the top-right corner of the screen, then tap several photos that you want to add to an album. Tap the Share Sheet button (the square with an arrow pointing out) in the bottom-left corner of the screen. Swipe up on the share sheet to reveal the actions below the sharing icons. Tap Add to Album. On the next screen, under My Albums, tap an existing album to add your chosen photos to. Alternately, tap the New Album option above them, give your new album a name, then tap Save. Frankly, it's probably time Apple renamed the share sheet and called it the "action sheet," because very often you'll now see just as many actions as share options listed in it (if not

How to Perform a Clean Installation of macOS 10.15 Catalina

This article guides you through the process of performing a clean installation of macOS 10.15 Catalina using the bootable USB drive method, rather than upgrading your Mac using Apple's standard installation package, which retains existing user data and any user-installed apps. Creating a bootable USB drive provides you with a convenient way to install a fresh copy of macOS Catalina on multiple Macs. Performing a clean install can also remove annoying quirks and strange behaviors that your Mac may have inherited over time, and often helps to reclaim disk space caused by junk files left by third-party apps. To follow the steps in this article, you'll need an empty 16GB or larger USB thumb drive (USB-C or USB-A, depending on your Mac) and an hour or two of downtime while the installation procedure completes. Also, be sure to perform a full backup of your Mac beforehand using Time Machine, so that you can restore your original system from the Recovery partition if something goes wrong.

How to Use App Exposé in iPadOS

With the launch of iPadOS, Apple enhanced the iPad multitasking experience by introducing interface features that help you keep track of all the apps you have open, including multiple instances of each app. One of those features is called App Exposé, and it lets you see all of the windows that are open for a particular app. Depending on what you're viewing, there are two ways to invoke App Exposé -- the following steps show you how. App Exposé: Method 1 From the Home screen, long press on an app icon until a menu appears. Tap Show All Windows to open App Exposé for that app. Note: If the option isn't listed in the pop-up menu, there aren't multiple instances of the app open. All the instances of the selected app will be displayed on a scrollable screen, including any that are active in Split Screen and Slide Over. App Exposé: Method 2 When you're in an app, or you're using Split Screen or Slide Over mode, slide your finger up from the bottom of the screen to reveal the Dock. Tap an app icon in the Dock. All the instances of the selected app will be displayed on a scrollable screen, including any that are active in Split Screen and Slide Over. When App Exposé is open, simply tap on an instance of an app to open it (including the app alongside it if it's in Split Screen

How to Share Folders in the iOS Notes App

In iOS 13, Apple fleshed out the feature set of the stock Notes app while enhancing the viewing and search functions in such a way that it's now easier than ever to generate, find, and organize your notes. In particular, there are new options to share entire folders of notes with friends or colleagues, including the ability to share your notes in a read-only capacity. Keep reading to learn how it's done. In iOS 12, users were limited to sharing individual notes in Apple's stock app, which was frustrating for heavy note-takers, to say the least. Fortunately, there are two ways you can share a folder of notes in ‌iOS 13‌. Method 1 Launch the Notes app on your iPhone or iPad. In the Folders view, swipe from right to left on the folder that you want to share. Tap the leftmost Share button (the blue icon). Check that the Share Options permissions at the bottom of the screen are set the way you want (invited people either Can make changes or View only). Choose how you'd like to share the folder. The default sharing options include iMessage, Mail, and a Copy Link option if you want to share the invitation link in another way that's not offered in the additional third-party sharing buttons shown. Method 2 Launch the Notes app on your iPhone or ‌iPad‌. Tap into the folder of notes that you want to share. Tap the circled ellipsis button at the top right corner of the screen. Select Add People in the pop-up menu. Check that the Share Options permissions at the bottom of the screen are set the way you want (invited people either Can make changes or View only).

Is Your macOS Catalina Install Stuck? Here's How to Fix It

Apple on Monday released macOS Catalina to the public, allowing everyone to install the newest version of the operating system for the Mac. Based on reports on the MacRumors forums, Twitter, and other social networks, some people are running into a specific problem - an installation that hangs. Image via MacRumors reader xodbox After downloading ‌macOS Catalina‌ and installing from the Mac App Store, some people have seen the installation process stop right at the "Setting Up Your Mac..." screen, and even after waiting for hours, it doesn't resolve. Luckily, there appears to be a super simple fix for this issue: Just restart. Hold down the power button on your Mac until it turns off, and then power it back on. Based on reports from MacRumors readers, this fix will send you to the login screen or to your desktop. After the Mac gets to the "Setting Up Your Mac..." screen, the ‌macOS Catalina‌ installation is largely complete. We don't recommend restarting right away, but if sits at that screen for a half hour or more, shut it down because it's not going to resolve on its own. The ‌macOS Catalina‌ installation takes some time so don't restart ahead of when the setup screen pops up, but based on a multitude of reports, resetting in this way if it gets stuck appears to be a safe way of getting your Mac up and running

How to Share Your Estimated Time of Arrival in Apple Maps

In the latest version of Apple Maps that comes with iOS 13, Apple has added a Share ETA feature that lets you share your estimated time of arrival at a location with a friend or family member, allowing them to follow your progress in real-time for the duration of the trip. The following steps explain how to use the Share ETA feature in ‌Apple Maps‌ on iPhone and iPad. Note that Apple nixed the feature for the initial public release of ‌iOS 13‌, but reintroduced it in the iOS 13.1 update, so make sure your device is up to date (Settings -> General -> Software Update). Launch ‌Apple Maps‌ on your iPhone or ‌iPad‌. Use the search field to input your destination address. Tap the blue Directions button. Tap the green Go button to start your turn-by-turn directions. Using the pill-shaped drag handle, drag the card up from the bottom of the screen to reveal further options. Tap the Share ETA button. Select a person from the suggestions to share your time of arrival with a friend, or tap the Contacts button to choose another contact.Note that ‌Apple Maps‌ keeps you informed about how many people you're sharing your journey with at the bottom of the directions

How to Quickly Shoot Video Using QuickTake on iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro

Apple has changed the way you shoot video in its redesigned Camera app for iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro devices. On older iPhones and on iPads, you had to select Video from the menu strip below the viewfinder, but thanks to the new "QuickTake" feature exclusive to Apple's new devices, it's much simpler. On ‌iPhone 11‌ series models, you can record videos without even switching out of the default photo mode. To capture a quick video, just press and hold the shutter button, then release the button to stop recording. To keep recording video without having to hold the button, slide the shutter button to the far right. The shutter will stretch elastically under your finger as you do so, and a target padlock icon will appear. When placed on the padlock, the shutter button will remain located there for as long as you shoot video. You can also tap the shutter to take a still photo during the recording. When you're ready to stop shooting video, simply tap the record button below the

How to Access the Camera Timer on iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro

Apple has redesigned the native Camera app for the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro to make the most of the enhanced photography capabilities of its new flagship phones and to make space for the various additional shooting options available. As a result, some of the functions that you may be used to seeing in the camera interface on older iPhones have moved around. The shutter timer is an example. Here's how to access it on ‌iPhone 11‌, ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌, and iPhone 11 Pro Max. Launch the Camera app on your iPhone. Tap the chevron at the top of the viewfinder to reveal the additional settings strip above the shutter button. Alternatively, swipe up from the camera mode menu at the bottom of the viewfinder. Tap the timer button. Choose the 3s or 10s option. Your timer selection will appear above the viewfinder. Tap the shutter button to take a picture after the selected time has elapsed.In addition to the timer, the camera settings strip includes options to access Night Mode, Live Photos, aspect ratios, and filters. Note that the timer option isn't available in some camera modes, including Video, Slo-mo, Pano, and Time-lapse.

How to Use the Find My App on a Friend's iPhone or iPad to Locate Your Missing Device

Following the release of iOS 13.1 and iPadOS 13.1, Apple now allows anyone with an Apple ID to use the Find My app on another person's iPhone or iPad to locate their own device if it's gone missing. For those unfamiliar with the app, ‌Find My‌ replaces the ‌Find My‌ Friends and the ‌Find My‌ iPhone apps of old and brings their features together in a unified interface that allows you to find whatever it is you need. By signing into ‌Find My‌ as a guest on a friend's device, you can use it to locate your lost device using the same functions that would be available to you if it was your own iPhone or ‌iPad‌. Here's how it works. Launch the ‌Find My‌ app on your friend's iOS device. Tap the Me tab, if it isn't already selected. With your finger on the pill-shaped drag handle, bring the Me tab up over the map to reveal the additional options. Tap Help a Friend at the bottom. Once the iCloud.com page has loaded, sign into your iCloud account using your Apple ID and password.After logging in, you'll be presented with a map and a list of all the devices that are signed into your ‌iCloud‌ account. You can also tap the arrow icon in the top-right corner of the screen to center the map on the currently selected device. Scroll up on the devices below the map to see the full list and find the device you're looking for. Note that the line below each device tells you its last known location, while a padlock on a device's icon indicates that it's lost and has been manually locked. If you tap a device in the list, you'll gain access to additional device options. The options

How to Refresh Locations in the Find My App

In iOS 13 and iPadOS, the Find My app replaces the ‌Find My‌ Friends and the ‌Find My‌ iPhone apps of old and brings their features together in a unified interface that allows you to find whatever it is you need. Like ‌Find My‌ Friends, the ‌Find My‌ app lets friends share their real-time location with you and vice versa. If your friend allows it, the app also lets you receive notifications whenever they leave or arrive at a location. In the old ‌Find My‌ apps, you could swipe down on the screen to manually update the location info of a person or device. In the new ‌Find My‌ app and with a good signal, the location beacons on the map in the People and Devices tabs are designed to refresh periodically and automatically every minute or so. If you think your connection's spotty or you don't want to wait for the next periodic refresh, you can perform a manual update. Simply tap the name of the person or device to open their card and zone in on their whereabouts. That should be all you have to do. Under their address, the time last seen should swiftly change to NOW. If opening the location card fails to refresh the time last seen, it could be due to a poor signal in either the area of the transmitter or the receiver – try moving to an area with a stronger cellular signal, then try again. You can also quit out of the app by swiping upwards and then reopen it to get the connection to refresh for all of your devices.

How to Disable Auto-Playing Video Previews on Apple TV

With the release of tvOS 13, Apple brought new features like Apple Arcade to Apple TV as well as a number of changes to the set-top box's interface. One of those changes includes autoplaying trailers on the Home screen. The new content previews on the Home screen make interacting with your ‌Apple TV‌ a little different. For example, in previous tvOS versions, using the Siri Remote to highlight Apple's TV app would make your Up Next queue appear in the Top Shelf of the Home screen. Now, it plays video trailers advertising content available on the iTunes Store. This is similar to what you'd expect to see on Netflix, which routinely auto-plays trailers in the hope that it will help you discover content more easily. Not everyone wants to see the same behavior on their ‌Apple TV‌ though, and the good news is that you can turn it off with an option buried in the device's settings. Launch the Settings app on your ‌Apple TV‌. Select General -> Accessibility -> Motion. Toggle off the switch for Auto-Play Video Previews. You can also move the TV app from the top row of the your ‌Apple TV‌'s Home screen and the videos should stop autoplaying. To do so, hover the selector over the TV app, then click and hold down on the Remote's touch surface for a couple of seconds. The app icon will start jiggling, at which point you can swipe to place it where you want. Simply click the touch surface again once you have moved the TV app from the top row to another location.

How to Flag Emails Using Different Colors on iPhone and iPad

In iOS 13 and iPadOS 13, Apple's Mail app retains the swipe gestures of previous iOS versions that help you reduce the amount of time you spend managing messages in your inbox. The basic inbox gestures still involve swiping right or left on an email to reveal tappable actions that you can perform instantly, without having to call up additional menus. One of the default options that appear is the Flag action, which you might use to categorize a message that requests information needed by a certain date, for example. Using only the swipe gesture, you'd be forgiven for thinking that the Mail app provides only one color to use when flagging emails, but ‌iOS 13‌ actually introduces support for multicolor flags – it's just hidden away in the menu that appears when you hit the Reply button. Tap the Flag button there, and you'll reveal a submenu that allows you to choose one of seven colors, including the option to remove a flag. Note that whichever color you select here subsequently becomes the default color when you tap the Flag action or the More -> Mark... option via the inbox swipe gesture. Did you know that you can customize the actions that appear when you use the Mail app's inbox gestures? Click here to learn how

How to Use the New Camera Lenses on iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max

The headline feature of Apple's 2019 iPhones is undoubtedly the new camera system, with the more affordable iPhone 11 boasting the same high-quality lenses as the iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max, with the exception of the third telephoto lens that's exclusive to the Pro models. The standard wide camera on the ‌iPhone 11‌ series offers the same 12 megapixels and f/1.8 aperture as on last year's iPhone XS devices, while the new 12 megapixel ultra-wide camera gets a f/2.4 lens. Apple has also widened the aperture of the telephoto lens on the Pro models to f/2.0 – an improvement over the f/2.4 lens found in the iPhone X and XS – which allows more light to hit the sensor and grab more detail. Lens-Based Camera App Changes Apple has also re-designed the camera system from the ground up to make the lenses work seamlessly in concert, and also radically improved the image processing technology. To accommodate these more advanced capabilities, Apple has given the stock Camera app a complete overhaul exclusively for its ‌iPhone 11‌ series devices. For example, when you shoot with the standard wide lens as shown above, the camera app interface becomes semi-transparent to reveal the ultra-wide camera's larger field of view, giving you a preview of what shooting with it would look like. This immersive preview isn't limited to the wide and ultra-wide either: When using the telephoto lens on Pro devices, the Camera app will use the standard wide lens to fill in the additional area of the screen, as shown in the screenshot below. There's even an optional new camera

How to Take Photos Using Night Mode on iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max

Last year, Google introduced its impressive Night Sight camera mode, a software-based feature that allows users to take detailed pictures in dark environments using Google Pixel smartphones. This year it's Apple's turn, and with the launch of the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max, the company unveiled a dramatic new Night Mode photo feature exclusive to its flagship smartphone lineup. When using the Camera app on any of Apple's 2019 iPhones, the new ‌Night Mode‌ feature comes on automatically when an indoor or outdoor scene is dark enough to warrant brightening, resulting in natural colors and reduced noise. In short, new iPhone users should see an immediate improvement when shooting in low light environments, without having to adjust any exposure settings. In photography, the amount of light that reaches the camera sensor is measured in the "lux" luminance metric, and Apple's ‌Night Mode‌ is designed to work in environments hovering around 10 lux. For a comparison, the outdoor light level on a clear day will be around 10,000 lux, while a windowed indoor space on the same day might get somewhere between 1,000-2,000 lux. A very dark day may reach about 100 lux, but during twilight and in dimly lit indoor environments you're probably looking at around 10-15 lux, which is when Night mode should present itself as an option in the Camera UI. When ‌Night Mode‌ is suggested but not engaged, you'll see a ‌Night Mode‌ button appear at the top of the viewfinder that looks like a crescent moon. If you think the scene would benefit from ‌Night Mode‌, simply tap the

How to Take Burst Photos on iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max

Burst Mode refers to when the camera on your iPhone captures a series of photos in rapid succession, at a rate of ten frames per second. It's a great way to shoot an action scene or an unexpected event, since you're always more likely to end up with the picture you were aiming for. Apple has changed the way Burst Mode works in its redesigned Camera app for iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro devices. On older iPhones and on iPads, you simply tap and hold the shutter button at the bottom of the Camera interface for the duration of the scene that you're trying to capture. However, on the ‌iPhone 11‌ series you have to press the shutter button and drag it towards the square displaying the last image you shot. The shutter will stretch elastically under your finger as you do. Notice that the counter increases in the shutter's original position for as long as you hold it down. This indicates how many shots are being captured in the current burst. Simply take your finger off the shutter when you want to end the burst of shots. When you take a series of burst photos, they automatically appear in the Photos app under the Album name Bursts. You'll also find them in your main Photo Library. To learn how to view and select the best of your Burst photos in the ‌Photos‌ app, click here.

How to Switch Focal Lengths in Portrait Mode on iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max

Apple's Portrait Mode has become a popular way of taking impressive shots using a depth-of-field effect known as bokeh, allowing iPhone users to shoot a photo that keeps the subject sharp with a blurred background. And now, exclusive to the iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max thanks to the triple-lens camera, you can switch between focal lengths in Portrait mode to get the best shot for your chosen scene. To use Portrait Mode, open the Camera app and swipe to Portrait mode. Portrait Lighting effects will appear at the bottom of the viewfinder. To change the focal length, tap the circular 1x button in the bottom-left of the viewfinder. 1x corresponds to the wide lens, and 2x switches to the telephoto lens. You can see the difference between the two modes in the second and third images above, but in general the 2x mode seems to be better for capturing people, while the 1x lens is better for shooting smaller objects. Apple has widened the aperture of the ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌'s telephoto lens to f/2.0 from f/2.4 in the iPhone X and XS. This allows more light to hit the sensor, which should translate to better Portrait Mode results in lower lighting conditions. Don't forget, you can now also switch to the front-facing camera and get a selfie in Portrait Mode,