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Apple Card: All the Details on Apple's Credit Card

Apple in August began the rollout of the Apple Card, a credit card that's linked to Apple Pay and built right into the Wallet app. Apple is partnering with Goldman Sachs for the card, which is optimized for Apple Pay but will still works like a traditional credit card for all of your transactions.

There's a lot of fine print associated with the new Apple Card, so we've created this guide to provide details on what you can expect when signing up for the card, which is currently available to a select number of beta testers and will be rolling out to everyone later in August.

What Would Yours Look Like?


The Apple Card comes with a physical titanium card with your name etched into it. Click on the image below to see how it would look with your name on it.


Click to change


Signing Up for Apple Card


Signing up for Apple Card is as simple as opening up the Wallet app, tapping on the Apple Card interface, and walking through the activation steps. Much of the information you need is pulled from your Apple ID, which means Apple Card setup takes just a couple of minutes to set up.


Information required includes first and last name, date of birth, phone number, home address, country of citizenship, the last four digits of your Social Security number, and your annual income. Some users may also be asked to scan their driver's license or state ID. There is an issue with the Apple Card right now that prevents Apple from accepting vertical IDs.


Once you've signed up for Apple Card, it will be available for use immediately for digital purchases. Availability is subject to credit approval, so you need to qualify for Apple Card just like you do with any other kind of credit card. While digital payments are available immediately, Apple will also ship out a physical Apple Card that can be used like a traditional credit card.

Apple Card Requirements


To get an Apple Card, you need to be 18 years or older and be a U.S. citizen or a lawful U.S. resident with a U.S. residential address (no P.O. Box).

An iPhone running iOS 12.4 or later is required to use the Apple Card, and it will not be available if you do not have an iPhone.

Two-factor authentication must be turned on, and you must be signed in to iCloud on your iPhone with your Apple ID.

Using Apple Card with Apple Pay


Apple Card is designed to work with any other credit or debit card stored in the Wallet app for use with Apple Pay. You can set it as the default card and use it for in store purchases on iPhone and online purchases on Apple Watch, iPhone, iPad, and Mac.

Using Apple Card for Non-Apple Pay Purchases


If you need to pay for purchases that can't be made with Apple Pay, you can use the physical version of the Apple Card that Apple sends once you sign up. In addition to Goldman Sachs, Apple is partnering with Mastercard, so the physical Apple Card can be used wherever Mastercard is accepted.


When your physical card comes in the mail, setting it is simple. On the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR, all you need to do is hold your iPhone near the envelope that it came in for an NFC scan and then tap the "Activate" button on your iPhone when it pops up.

On the iPhone X and earlier, you need to open up the Apple Card, open the Wallet app, tap the "Activate" button in the Wallet app and then hold your iPhone near the packaging that the Apple Card came in. Unlike traditional cards, you do not need to place a phone call for activation purposes.

The Titanium Apple Card


With Apple Card you can make digital Apple Pay payments, but Apple is also providing a physical card. Since this is a credit card designed by Apple, it is, of course, unique among credit cards.


It's made entirely from titanium, which is laser etched with your name. The front of the card does not have a card number or an expiration date listed, and on the back, there's no CVV and no signature. If someone finds or steals your card, there's no real way for them to use it, at least for online purchases.


There's still a traditional magstripe on the back, along with a built-in chip. While the card number and CVV are not on the card itself, you can find them in the Wallet app if you need them.

The physical Apple Card does not support contactless payments itself -- you need to use your iPhone for Apple Pay payments. There is no cost for the card and there is no fee associated with replacing it if you lose it.

The titanium Apple Card weighs in at 14.7 grams, which is heavier than the Chase Sapphire Preferred and lighter than the AMEX Platinum, both of which are also considered heavier weight cards.

Apple Card on iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and Mac


The Apple Card offers deep integration with the Wallet app on the iPhone, but it can also be used on the iPad, Apple Watch, and the Mac for making purchases and viewing some credit card information.

Adding the Apple Card to iPad can be done via the Wallet & Apple Pay section in the Settings app and the Wallet & Apple Pay section of the My Watch tab in the Apple Watch app on iPhone.

On Mac, you can add Apple Card by going to System Preferences, selecting Wallet & Apple Pay, and clicking the "+" button to add the Apple Card. Adding an Apple Card to Wallet on Mac requires a Mac with Touch ID.

On Macs without Touch ID, you can turn on the "Allow Payments" feature that will let you complete purchases on your Mac using authentication via an eligible iPhone or Apple Watch.

Credit Limits


As with any other credit card, there is a credit limit for Apple Card that will vary from person to person. A better credit score means a higher credit limit, and credit limit also increases over time.

Making Payments


You'll be able to pay your Apple Card balance using a linked bank account or Apple Cash in the Wallet app. There is no option to make payments over the web.

Monthly Statements


Monthly Apple Card statements are provided in the Wallet app. You can save a PDF of the statement from the Wallet app so that you can access it on other devices.

Multiple Users


There is no option for multiple users or sharing cards at this time. There's one card per person and one card per account, which means spouses and family members cannot share a single Apple Card account.

Fees


Apple says there are no annual fees, international fees, fees for making a late payment or fees for exceeding your credit limit.

There may be no late fees, but if you make a late or miss one payment, Apple says this will result in "additional accumulating toward your balance." That means making a late payment will not result in penalty rates, aka increased interest rates. You're still going to have to pay interest on the outstanding balance, and a late payment will impact credit score, but interest rates won't increase.

There are no foreign transaction fees, but the exchange rate for foreign transactions is determined by Mastercard.

PIN for International Purchases


The Wallet app does not provide a PIN, which is often necessary when making credit card purchases outside of the United States. There is no PIN support, which means the Apple Card may not be accepted by some international vendors.

Interest Rates


The Apple Card offers an APR between 12.99 percent and 23.99 percent based on your credit score. On the low end, that's lower than the national average APR of 17.67 percent, but it doesn't offer APRs as low as some other credit cards.


Apple is aiming to make the Apple Card available to as many customers as possible with its wide APR range, offering it even to those with less than stellar credit scores. There are tools built into the Wallet app to encourage users to pay off their balances quicker to avoid interest fees.

Credit Check


A credit check is required when signing up for the Apple Card. Approvals are done by Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs uses TransUnion for credit checks. If you have a credit freeze applied, you will need to unfreeze your TransUnion credit.

TransUnion has an option to temporarily release your credit report for a set number of days, which makes it easy to unfreeze and then refreeze your credit. Lifting your credit freeze temporarily is free.

Apple does a soft credit pull when you apply for Apple card so you can see Apple's offer with credit limit and APR. A hard pull happens after you hit the "accept" button.

Credit Ranges


Apple wanted to make the Apple Card accessible to as many people as possible, which means Apple Card partner Goldman Sachs is approving people with a wide range of credit scores.

Reports have suggested that some customers with credit scores in the 600s have been successfully approved. APRs and credit limits will vary based on credit score, but many people may be able to successfully get an Apple Card.

Rewards System


Apple offers a cash back rewards system for the Apple Card, providing daily cash up to 3 percent. Depending on your particular spending habits, there may be better options available (Apple Card Rewards vs Others).

With Apple Card, you get 1 percent cash back for all of your purchases, which is just okay compared to many other credit cards available. On purchases made with Apple Pay, you get 2 percent cash back, a good motivator to use Apple Pay where available.


For purchases made from the Apple Store (physical or online) you'll get three percent back. This also includes purchases made from the App Store, iTunes Store, and Apple services.

Daily Cash


One of the perks of Apple Card's rewards system is "Daily Cash," with Apple paying out your cash back bonuses on a daily basis rather than making you wait weeks for them to show up on a statement.

If you've signed up for Apple Cash (the feature that adds an Apple Pay Cash debit card to your Wallet for sending and receiving money from friends) you will get your Daily Cash payouts on your Apple Cash card.


Apple Cash is required for Daily Cash, but if you don't have Apple Cash set up, you'll still get your rewards, just on a monthly basis as a credit on your statement balance. There is no limit on the amount of Daily Cash that you can get, according to Apple.

How Daily Cash Can Be Used


Your Daily Cash balance, which is transferred to your Apple Cash card (essentially an Apple debit card) can be used for Apple Pay purchases, sent to friends or family using the Apple Cash feature in Messages, or transferred over to your bank account.

Apple Cash can be transferred to your bank account at no cost, a process that takes between one and three days. There's also an Instant Transfer feature that will cost one percent of the total money being sent. The Instant Transfer fee has a minimum of $0.25 and maxes out at $10. Transfers can be initiated in the Wallet app after linking a bank account to Apple Cash.

Daily Cash - Returns


If you return a purchase that you made with Apple Card, you will be refunded the purchase price. Daily Cash that you received when making the purchase is charged back to the Apple Card.

Spend Tracking and Budgeting


All transactions made with the Apple Card are listed clearly in the Wallet app with color-coded categories like Food and Drinks, Shopping and Entertainment, and more. Apple Card also provides weekly and monthly spending summaries, again using the same color coding so you can see what you're spending at a glance.


Along with categorized spend tracking, the Wallet app provides a Total Balance summary that provides a look at your previous monthly balance, new spending (including pending transactions, and any payments or credits that have been made.


Interest charged and Daily Cash earned are also offered up, and users can see PDF statements from past months.

Purchase Notifications


As is the case with many cards added to Apple Pay, when you make a purchase with Apple Card, you'll get an instant notification right on your phone. This will let you know immediately if there's a charge that you don't recognize, and there are built-in tools for flagging a fraudulent purchase.


Clear Transaction Labeling


Apple is using machine learning and Apple Maps to make sure that all of your Apple Card transactions are clearly labeled. If you've opened up a credit card statement and have seen a confusing arrangement of truncated letters and numbers instead of a full merchant name, that's the problem Apple is solving.


All transactions are listed clearly with merchant name and exact location so you can better keep track of what was purchased and where it was purchased.

Payments


Apple Card shows you multiple payment options and it calculates the amount of interest that you'll be paying on different payment amounts in real time. Apple says Apple Card is designed to encourage customers to pay a bit more every month to cut down on interest, and it offers the flexibility to schedule payments in multiple ways -- weekly, biweekly, and monthly rather than just monthly. You can also make a one-time payment if desired.


Payments are made by linking a bank account to your Wallet app, but Apple Cash can also be used as an Apple Card payment method. If you've already linked a bank account for Apple Cash, Apple will ask you if you want to use the same bank account for Apple Card, but you can also select a different account or swap your account at any time.

Privacy


As with any credit or debit card added to Wallet, Apple creates a unique card number on iPhone for Apple Card that's stored in the Secure Element. All payments are confirmed with Face ID or Touch ID along with a one-time unique dynamic security code.

This system means Apple does not know which stores a customer shopped at, what was purchased, or how much was paid.

Goldman Sachs, Apple's partner, can see data for internal reporting purposes, but it cannot be used for external or internal marketing or advertising, and the same goes for any regulatory or operational third-party partner.

Benefits


Because Apple Card uses the Mastercard network for payment processing, it offers benefits available to Mastercard card holders, such as fraud protection, identity theft protection, and a free ShopRunner membership that offers free two-day shipping from some websites.

Other benefits include Mastercard's travel discounts and upgrades, Mastercard's exclusive "special events," Mastercard golf offerings, and home rental discounts via Onefinestay, all of which are available to all Mastercard users.

Purchase protection and extended warranties offered by some credit cards as benefits are not available with the Apple Card.

Exporting Data


Apple Card does not support exporting data to financial apps like Quicken, Mint, or Banktivity at the current time, according to Apple's support documents. Data will need to be entered into these apps manually.

Virtual Card Numbers for Online Non-Apple Pay Purchases


There are no credit card numbers or other information on the physical titanium Apple Card. This data is instead available in the app, leaving some questions about online purchases where you often need a number and a CVV.

Apple Card is able to generate virtual card numbers for these kinds of purchases. The Wallet app provides a virtual card number and a virtual confirmation code, with the number being semi-permanent and able to be regenerated whenever you want. This info can be used for non-Apple Pay online purchases, over-the-phone purchases, and other similar situations.

There is not, however, support for single-use numbers or single-merchant numbers for having separate card numbers for different merchants. Purchases are also protected by a one-time use dynamic security code rather than a persistent CVV.

Apple Card Support


Apple Card support is handled through the Messages app, with support representatives available 24/7. All you need to do is send a text, which is a handy way to interact with support staff.

If you run into an issue with a transaction, you can select the transaction and tap on the "Report an Issue" option. This lets you provide feedback to Apple if the wrong spend category, merchant name, or location is listed.

It also provides tools for a Charge Dispute, Unknown Transaction, and Other, which will put you in touch with the Apple Card support staff.

Apple Card Denials


Apple has a detailed support document outlining reasons why people might be declined for an Apple Card, and what can be done about it.

Reasons for denial include low credit score, frequent credit card applications, heavy debt and low income, tax liens, bankruptcy, property repossession, past due debt obligations, a recent checking account closure by a bank, past due medical debt, and more.

For those denied, Apple recommends requesting a free credit report and checking for common errors that can be disputed if inaccurate.

Apple Card Tutorial Videos


Apple has shared a range of videos on Apple Card setup and usage, including making a purchase in a store, making a purchase online, activating the card, making a payment, getting support, and more, with a full list below.

Availability


Apple Card is limited to the United States, but in the future, it could be expanding to additional countries much like Apple Pay has expanded, and Apple is already said to be in talks with European regulators about an expansion in Europe. Apple Card will be able to be used worldwide where Mastercard is accepted.


Customer Agreement


The Apple Card Customer Agreement provides additional insight into how the Apple Card works and the terms and conditions of its usage. Details are available on the Goldman Sachs website. [PDF]

Launch Date


The Apple Card launched to a limited number of users on August 6, and will roll out to everyone later in August.

Feature Summary

  • Up to 3% cash back
  • Daily cash back
  • No fees
  • Accepted worldwide (wherever Mastercard is available)
  • Engraved Titanium physical card with concealed numbers
  • Easy sign-up on iPhone
  • Spending tracking
  • Clear transaction labeling
  • Privacy focused

Guide Feedback


See something we left out of our Apple Card guide or have a question not answered here? Let us know in the comments or Send us an email here.


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During today's earnings call for the third fiscal quarter of 2019, Apple CEO Tim Cook confirmed that Apple plans to launch its Apple Card credit card in August. Thousands of employees are currently testing the card, and Apple will be ready to debut it soon. Cook did not provide a specific date in August for the launch, so it could come at any time. Created in partnership with Goldman Sachs, the Apple Card is deeply integrated with Apple Pay and the Wallet app, though there is also a physical titanium card that can be used for in-person purchases. Apple Card can be used for both standard purchases and Apple Pay purchases, with Apple providing rewards for both. Customers will get 3 percent cash back for purchases made at an Apple Store, 2 percent cash back for all Apple Pay purchases, and 1 percent cash back for all other purchases. Cash back is provided in the form of "Daily Cash" that, as the name suggests, is paid out to customers on a daily basis. Daily Cash is added to the Apple Cash card in Wallet and can be used for purchases, sent to friends, or transferred to a bank account. In the Wallet app, Apple will offer spend tracking and other budgeting tools. Color-coded categories will give users an idea of how much money they're spending on food, activities, shopping, health care, entertainment, and more. Apple Card will be limited to the United States at launch, but may expand to additional countries in the future. For more details on the Apple Card, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.

Apple Card Said to Launch as Early as First Half of August

Apple's highly anticipated launch of Apple Card is on schedule and will launch in the U.S. in just a few weeks, reports Bloomberg this morning. The Apple Card is targeted to launch as early as the first half of August. That timing means the project is on schedule for the summer release date that Apple first announced in March. According to the report, iPhone users will be able to sign up for the card in the Wallet app, which will have built-in Apple Card support as part of the latest iOS 12.4 update. Apple is partnering with Goldman Sachs for the card, which is going to be optimized for Apple Pay but will still work like a traditional credit card for all of your transactions. Apple's virtual credit card will also be available as a physical titanium card for use at merchants that don't accept Apple Pay. According to today's report, Apple expressed misgivings in May about the underlying technology Goldman Sachs had developed to power the credit card, and Apple asked the bank for changes to be made. However, Apple Card's summer launch still appears to be on track, so Goldman Sachs presumably allayed Apple's concerns in time. The bank is responsible for the underlying infrastructure, managing payment disputes, handling transaction data and collating information for monthly statements. Thousands of Apple employees have been testing the Apple Card, which offers 3% cash back on Apple purchases, 2% cash back on all Apple Pay transactions, and 1% cash back on all other purchases. According to Apple, signing up for Apple Card will be as simple as opening up the

Leaked Images Show Apple Card's Design in the Wild

Apple's upcoming Apple Card credit card is now being tested by both its corporate and retail employees ahead of a planned summer launch, and unsurprisingly, some images of the card have leaked out. We already know what the Apple Card looks like thanks to Apple's promotional materials, but it's still interesting to see the design in person, with iMore sharing some photos provided by an Apple employee. In person, the titanium card is as minimalist as it looks online, with the front featuring a simple embossed Apple logo, a chip, and a name, which in iMore's image, has been removed for privacy. There's no card number or expiration date included, nor is there a CVV on the back. The Apple Card won't use a traditional card number, instead generating virtual card numbers and confirmation codes for purchases, which can be obtained from the Wallet app on the iPhone. The back of the Apple Card is just as barren as the front, featuring embossed Goldman Sachs and Mastercard logos, along with a magstripe at the back. Goldman Sachs and Mastercard are Apple's Apple Card partners. For those curious, the Apple Card appears to weigh in at 14.75 grams. Apple delivers the Apple Card in a plain white sleeve with an Apple logo on the front. The inside is multicolored, representing the different purchase categories that will be listed and colorized inside the Apple Wallet app when you make an Apple Card purchase. According to iMore, Apple is approving people with a range of credit scores. A person with a credit rating between 600 and 700 was approved, though with a $1,000

Thousands of Apple Retail Workers Now Testing Apple Card Ahead of Summer Launch

Ahead of the Apple Card's planned summer launch, Apple is now testing its upcoming Goldman Sachs credit card with thousands of retail workers, reports Bloomberg. Apple was previously allowing its corporate employees to test the Apple Card, but is now expanding testing to a much larger group through an internal beta program that launched this week. Employees are able to sign up directly from their personal devices, with the Apple Pay portion of the card activated immediately and a card scheduled to be sent within two to three weeks. Employees are receiving APRs between 13.24 percent and 24.24 percent, the same APR range that will be provided to consumers. With thousands of retail workers available, the expansion marks the first wide scale test, allowing Apple to find and address bugs and other problems before the Apple Card launches to the public. Apple employees have been asked not to discuss the card, but they are allowed to use it in public to make purchases.Screenshots of the employee beta of the Apple Card show that test versions of the card are fully functional and include the ability to receive daily cash back, pay bills, see an order status for a physical card and receive technical support via text messaging. Users can also schedule payments, access their credit limit and manage connected bank accounts, among other tasks. Users will also have the ability to set the Apple Card as the default payment method for Apple purchases.The Apple Card, created in partnership with Goldman Sachs, is deeply integrated into the iPhone and the Apple ecosystem. It

Citigroup Reportedly Passed on Apple Card Due to Profitability Concerns

Apple is set to launch its own credit card this summer in the United States in partnership with investment bank Goldman Sachs and Mastercard. The aptly named Apple Card will be built into the Wallet app on the iPhone, with a physical version available for use at stores that do not accept contactless payments. Apple is aiming to shake up the credit card industry by collecting no fees whatsoever, offering one to three percent cash back paid out on a daily basis, and providing consumers with interactive features such as color-coded spending summaries in the Wallet app to assist with spending and budgeting. Now, a report says those consumer-friendly plans led some other banks to ultimately pass over the Apple Card opportunity. According to CNBC, Citigroup was in advanced negotiations with Apple over the card, but pulled out amid doubts that it could earn an acceptable profit on the partnership. The report claims that other banks, including J.P. Morgan Chase, Barclays, and Synchrony, also bid on the Apple Card business. Goldman Sachs has an advantage over those other banks since it does not already offer its own consumer credit cards, so it does not have to worry about potentially cannibalizing one of its own businesses. "Goldman Sachs seeks to disrupt consumer finance by putting the customer first. We are excited for customers to use Apple Card, which is designed to help people take control of their financial lives," a spokesperson for the bank told CNBC. Apple Card support will likely be added in iOS 12.4, with some Apple employees already receiving

Apple Employees Starting to Receive Apple Cards (Photos)

Mobile leaker Ben Geskin shared images on Twitter of the consumer packaging of the new Apple credit card coming from Apple. Geskin reports some Apple employees are already starting to get the card which was announced in March. Some Apple employees are getting Apple Card, so I received this photos, edited the name to protect the source and this also works as a watermark 😊👌🏻 https://t.co/UcSzcEDY3v— Ben Geskin (@BenGeskin) May 12, 2019 In the images, the actual Apple employee's name was replaced by Geskin's to protect their identify. The packaging shows a similar pairing process as the AirPods, with instructions to "Wake iPhone and hold here." The Apple Card resides both digitally in your iPhone for Apple Pay payments but also comes in a physical form made entirely of titanium. The card is laser etched with your name and does not have the card number or expiration date printed on it. Instead, those numbers will be available on your iPhone's Wallet App. There's still a traditional magstripe on the back, along with a built-in chip for chip and pin purchases. The Apple Card is expected to launch this summer.

Apple Card Won’t Support Multiple Users, No Cost Associated With Physical Card

Apple this summer will introduce the Apple Card, a new credit card that it's offering in partnership with Goldman Sachs. Apple presented the Apple Card at its March 25 event and launched an Apple Card website, but there were still many questions about how it will work. TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino today shared some new details on the Apple Card that were provided by Apple, giving a little more insight into how it will work and answering a few of the questions we saw from MacRumors readers. First and foremost, Apple Card is not going to support multiple users. People who use a single account with two shared credit cards at the current time are not going to be able to do the same thing with Apple Card. It's one card per person and one card per account. There is no cost associated with the physical Apple Card, even though it's made of laser-etched titanium. Apple isn't going to charge you for the card itself and there isn't going to be a penalty fee if you lose it and need a replacement. There is an in-app option to freeze your card in the event that it's stolen. Speaking of the physical Apple Card, Apple has implemented a neat activation method - you'll just tap it against the iPhone when you get it, without the need to place a phone call for activation like you have to do with existing credit and debit cards. When using the physical card, no signatures will be required. Though it's tap to activate, the physical card itself isn't going to support contactless payments. You need your iPhone for that. Paying your balance can be done in the Wallet app