Guides

Apple Student Discount Guide: Savings for Students and Teachers

If you're a student or a teacher, you should know that Apple offers educational discounts on a variety of Apple products, along with cheaper Apple Music subscriptions and more. This guide provides details on the educational benefits that you can get from Apple as a student or a teacher along with eligibility requirements. Apple's Educational Site Apple has an entire separate site that's dedicated to students and teachers who are interested in buying Apple products at a discount, with the products listed at their educational pricing. The EDU store offers a discount on all Mac and all iPad models. With the EDU discount, for example, the entry-level MacBook Air is available for $999 instead of $1099, a discount of $100, and the ‌iPad‌ is available for $309 instead of $329. Discounts available vary based on price point, but are right around the 10 percent mark. You'll see the biggest discounts on Apple's most expensive items, such as the iMac Pro, which is marked down by $400. Apple does not offer educational discounts on the iPhone, Apple Watch, HomePod, Apple TV, AirPods, or Apple accessories. Eligibility According to Apple's EDU sales policies in the United States, the following people are eligible to make a purchase from the EDU store: Students attending a higher education institution, such as a university. Faculty and staff of higher education institutions. Any employee of a public or private K-12 institution in the United States, including school board members or appointed members (like PTA or PTO executives). Homeschool teachers. Pa

Top 14 AirPods Pro Tips and Tricks

Apple in October 2019 debuted the AirPods Pro, a new higher-end version of its existing AirPods with an updated design, noise cancellation technology, a customizable fit with silicone ear tips, and a more expensive $249 price tag. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. We've collected 14 of our favorite ‌AirPods Pro‌ tips to help you get the most out of Apple's latest and greatest wireless earbuds. Check out our video, keep reading, and you might discover a new trick or two. 1. Take Out Your ‌AirPods Pro‌ the Right Way Have you found yourself getting frustrated trying to wrestle each AirPod Pro out of the case? Well, we're here to tell you "you're holding it wrong." Apple has designed them in such a way that you simply have to push on the back of each earbud and it will swivel right out between your thumb and forefinger. 2. Enable Noise Cancellation for Better Audio ‌AirPods Pro‌ are Apple's first in-ear headphones with Active Noise Cancellation (ANC), which adapts to the shape of your ear and blocks out the outside world so you can focus on what you're listening to. ANC relies on a feature called Ambient EQ, which Apple says adjusts the sound signal 200 times a second to optimize audio for your specific ear shape through the use of an internal-facing microphone. When you turn off noise cancellation, Ambient EQ is also disabled, meaning sound quality is slightly degraded. So for the best Airpods Pro audio experience, it's better to keep noise cancellation on. By default, pressing and holding either AirPod Pro stem will cycle

When Might Apple Release an Arm-Based Mac?

There have been rumors suggesting Apple has an interest in Arm-based Macs for years now, but speculation about an Arm-based Mac has picked up over the course of the last year following rumors about Apple's work on its own chips designed for the Mac. Right now, Apple is reliant on Intel for the processors used across its Mac lineup, but that is perhaps set to change in the future as Apple works to transition over to Arm-based chips similar to the A-series chips used in its iPhones and iPads. Arm vs. Intel Right now, Apple uses x86 chips from Intel in all of its Mac products, while its iPhones and iPads use Arm-based chips. x86 chips and Arm chips are built using different architectures. Intel's chips are CISC (Complex Instruction Set Architecture) while Arm chips are RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer). Were Apple to switch from CISC Intel chips to RISC it would likely have a positive impact on power efficiency and compute efficiency for everyday users because most people don't use applications that take advantage of the more complex instructions of a CISC chip. A chip instruction set can be likened to different words in the English language that mean the same thing. As an example, someone might use the word "hit" multiple times in a day, but would rarely find a reason to use the word "pummel." An RISC chip in this scenario only knows the word "hit," while a CISC chip knows the word "pummel." When there's a call for the "hit" instruction to be made multiple times, the RISC chip would need to use multiple "hit" instructions, while the CISC chip can more

AirPods Pro vs Powerbeats Pro

Apple in late October 2019 surprised us with an upgraded version of the AirPods called the AirPods Pro, which feature Active Noise Cancellation, superior sound quality, and an all-new design. Apple's ‌AirPods Pro‌ are its second set of headphones to feature the "Pro" moniker, following the Beats-branded Powerbeats Pro earbuds that Apple released back in April 2019. In this guide, we'll go over all of the differences between the ‌AirPods Pro‌ and the ‌Powerbeats Pro‌. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. ‌AirPods Pro‌ Design vs. PowerBeats Pro Design The ‌AirPods Pro‌ are designed for casual use, while the ‌Powerbeats Pro‌ are aimed specifically at those who are using them for workouts like running, biking, and trips to the gym. Design wise, the ‌AirPods Pro‌ look similar to the ‌AirPods‌ 2 but with a much shorter stem and a tweaked body design that incorporates flexible silicone ear tips, a first for the ‌AirPods‌ line. The silicone ear tips snap right onto the base of the ‌AirPods Pro‌, allowing for a comfortable fit and Active Noise Cancellation technology. Apple designed the silicone tips of the ‌AirPods Pro‌ to ensure a comfortable fit in most ears, with the design aimed at conforming to the contours of each individual ear for a superior seal. ‌AirPods Pro‌ have also been designed with what Apple is calling an "innovative vent system" that's meant to equalize pressure within the ear to minimize discomfort that's common in other in-ear designs. Apple says that ‌AirPods Pro‌ will make you feel like there's nothing in your ears, and in testing, we

How Long Do AirPods and AirPods Pro Last?

Are you hearing the low battery warning on your AirPods more frequently than you used to? It's quite possible that your wireless Apple headphones reaching their end of life. This article explains why – and what you can do about it. What is the Battery Life of AirPods and AirPods Pro? Officially, Apple says its first-generation AirPods offer up to five hours of listening time and up to two hours of talk time on one charge, while second-generation AirPods provide up to an extra hour of talk time. AirPods Pro feature the same battery life as AirPods with up to five hours of listening time, but in Active Noise Cancellation mode, listening time is reduced to four and a half hours and talk time is limited to up to three and a half hours. The Charging Cases for all models offer up to 24 hours of additional listening time or over additional 18 hours of talk time. The phrase "up to" is of course the key qualifier that Apple elects to use here, and it's not just to account for certain usage scenarios that can sap battery life quicker (see below). It's also because if you've owned AirPods for a while and you use them pretty much every day, you may struggle to get anything near the stated battery life without recharging them a lot more often than you used to. So How Long Do AirPods Actually Last? The limiting factor of the lifespan of AirPods or AirPods Pro earbuds is the ability of their batteries to retain a change. Over time, you'll find that the AirPods won't last up to five hours anymore. Battery life per charge may fall significantly over several months of

AirPods vs. AirPods Pro: Features Compared

Apple has unveiled higher-end AirPods Pro with several improvements over the regular AirPods, including active noise cancellation, improved sound quality, and water and sweat resistance. To help decide between the AirPods and AirPods Pro, read our side-by-side comparison of the earphones below. AirPods vs AirPods Pro Differences AirPods Pro features in bold: $249 vs $199 Three Ear Tip Sizes vs One Noise Cancelation vs None Water Resistance vs None Design and Fit Differences AirPods Pro sport an all-new in-ear design with three sizes of soft, flexible silicone tips that click into place, including small, medium, and large. Meanwhile, the standard AirPods have a one-size fits all design. While many people found this adequate, some users had issues with the original AirPods design falling our or hurting their ears. Apple says the new tips are designed to conform to your ear shape, keeping the AirPods Pro secure, while a vent system equalizes pressure to minimize discomfort. AirPods Pro also have a feature named the Ear Tip Fit Test that checks the fit of the ‌earphones in your ears to determine which size of ear tips provides the best seal and acoustic performance. Ear Tip Fit Test can be accessed by tapping the info icon next to your ‌AirPods Pro‌ in Settings > Bluetooth. Apple says advanced algorithms work together with the inward-facing microphones in each AirPod to measure the sound level in the ear and compare it to what is coming from the speaker driver. In just seconds, the algorithm detects whether the ear tip is the right size and has a

AirTags: Everything We Know So Far

Apple is working on a Tile-like Bluetooth tracking device that's designed to be attached to items like keys and wallets for tracking purposes, letting you find them right in the Find My app. Based on assets found in iOS 13.2 and trademarking details dug up by MacRumors, Apple seems to be planning to call its tracking accessory the "AirTag." A mockup of what AirTags could look like AirTags are still in the works and there's no prospective release date yet, but signs of them have been found in iOS 13 betas so we do know a bit about what we can expect when they're available. This guide goes over everything that we know about AirTags at the current time. What are AirTags? AirTags are small tracking tiles with Bluetooth connectivity that can be used to find lost items. There are several similar products on the market, such as Tile and Adero, but Apple's version will be more deeply integrated with Apple devices. How will AirTags work? AirTags will have built-in chips that will allow them to connect to an iPhone, relaying the position of devices that they're attached to. You will be able to use your iPhone, iPad, and Mac to track the location of AirTags much like you do to find missing Apple devices. What will AirTags look like? Based on images found within an internal build of ‌iOS 13‌, AirTags are small, circular white tags with an Apple logo on the front. Presumably, these will attach to items via adhesive or an attachment point like a ring, and there may be multiple ways to use them with different items. AirTags might not look quite like this because

iPhone 11 and 11 Pro: Camera Features and Tips

With the new iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro, Apple introduced updated dual and triple-lens camera systems, respectively, and added quite a few new camera features that are worth knowing about. In our latest YouTube video, we've highlighted all of the most useful camera features and functions included in the ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro for those who are coming from an older iPhone and want to know what's new. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Photos Outside the Frame When you take a photo with the telephoto or wide-angle camera on the ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ or the wide-angle lens on the ‌iPhone 11‌, there's a feature that automatically captures what's outside the frame using one of the other lenses, just in case you accidentally cut something out. You can turn this on in the Camera section of the Settings app and take advantage of it when editing pictures in the ‌Photos‌ app. Any photo with a square icon and a star has more outside the frame that can be used when changing the crop of the photo. It's a bit of a niche feature, but it can come in handy for group shots, landscape images, architecture photos, and other situations where you might want to change the crop of the image after taking a picture. ‌Photos‌ Outside the Frame doesn't work on all images all the time and you're not going to want to leave it on all the time because it disables another feature -- Deep Fusion. Deep Fusion When you upgrade to iOS 13.2, you'll get a new camera feature called Deep Fusion, which is something that works in the background and doesn't need to be turned on. Deep

Relocated Items in macOS Catalina Explained

After upgrading to macOS Catalina, you may be surprised to discover a shortcut on your Mac's desktop to a Relocated Items folder that wasn't there previously. The generation of this folder is actually normal behavior when upgrading an older version of macOS to Catalina, but we're highlighting it in this article because a lot of users are confused about why the folder exists and what to do with its contents. What Are Relocated Items? Relocated items are older files and data from previous macOS installations that Apple is not sure what to do with after upgrading to Catalina. Catalina is the first version of macOS to adopt wholesale the relatively new Apple File System (APFS), which is optimized for the flash storage used in recent Macs. Aside from introducing a bunch of other new technical features, an APFS-formatted disk uses a space-sharing "container" that can house multiple secure "volumes" or file systems. This allows the disk's free space to be shared on demand and allocated to any of the individual volumes in the container as required. When you upgrade to macOS 10.15, Catalina is installed on a dedicated read-only system volume called "Macintosh HD," while your files and data are stored separately in another volume named "Macintosh HD - Data." The idea behind this setup is that it helps prevent the accidental overwriting of critical operating system files, since the user can no longer alter data or store files on the read-only system volume. In practice, the average user shouldn't notice any difference after the split, since both volumes appear in

Haptic Touch vs 3D Touch: What's the Difference?

With the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max, Apple did away with 3D Touch across its entire iPhone lineup, replacing the former ‌3D Touch‌ feature with Haptic Touch. In this guide, we'll go over everything you need to know about Haptic Touch and how it differs from the ‌3D Touch‌ feature that's been available since the iPhone 6s. What is Haptic Touch? Haptic Touch is a 3D Touch-like feature that Apple first introduced in the 2018 iPhone XR and later expanded to its entire iPhone lineup. Haptic Touch uses the Taptic Engine and provides haptic feedback when the screen is pressed on one of Apple's new iPhones. A Haptic Touch is a touch and hold gesture, and it can be used across the iOS 13 operating system. Haptic Touch can be used by pressing in a relevant location until a little haptic pop is felt against the finger and a secondary menu pops up, with content varying based on where you're using the feature. A simple tap will activate one of the options on the secondary menu that pops up. How is Haptic Touch different from ‌3D Touch‌? ‌3D Touch‌ supports multiple levels of pressure, so you could have a softer press do one thing and a harder press do another thing. As an example, Apple used the multiple pressure levels for "Peek and Pop" gestures. On a ‌3D Touch‌ device, you were able "Peek" into a web link to see a preview, and then press harder to pop into it and open it up in Safari, for example. Those secondary "pop" gestures are not available with Haptic Touch because it's a single level of pressure (essentially a long press) rather than multiple pressure

iPadOS Tips and Tricks: Gestures, Home Screen Tweaks, Keyboard Options, and More

iPadOS, launched last week, offers almost all of the same features as iOS 13, but there are also a handful of new features exclusively designed for the larger screen, which is why Apple split iOS and iPadOS into separate updates. In our latest YouTube video and in the article below, we go over some must-know ‌iPadOS‌ tips and tricks that are useful to those who have updated to ‌iPadOS‌ and want to get more familiar with the changes. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. ‌iPadOS‌ Tips and Tricks Quick Screenshots - If you swipe up with the Apple Pencil on the iPad's display, you can capture a screenshot that opens right into Markup so you can start editing and annotating it right away. Floating Keyboard - There's a new floating keyboard on the ‌iPad‌ that can be positioned anywhere. To get to it, pinch in on the keyboard until it shrinks down or long press on the keyboard icon to bring up the "floating" option and then tap it. It's a small version of the keyboard that you can put anywhere on the screen, which is ideal for one handed use. QuickPath Keyboard - ‌iPadOS‌ and ‌iOS 13‌ both have a new native swipe-based keyboard that Apple calls the QuickPath keyboard. Rather than typing, swipe your fingers between letters to spell a word. Hate it? You can turn it off in the Settings app, or just continue to use tap to type, which hasn't gone anywhere. Overhauled Home Screen - You can fit more icons on the ‌iPad‌'s Home screen, and the Today view widget can now be permanently positioned on the Home screen when the ‌iPad‌ is in landscape mode. After

Night Mode on iPhone 11: Everything You Need to Know

Apple's newest iPhones, the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max, are equipped with a new feature called Night mode, which is designed to take crisp, clear photos even when lighting conditions are poor, such as at night. Night mode, as the name suggests, lets you take photos in the evening, with lighting that has never before been possible on an iPhone thanks to new hardware and new machine learning algorithms. Though Night mode brightens photos, it also preserves the night time feeling, balancing the light and dark elements of an image. Android smartphone makers like Google and Samsung have had special modes for brightening up evening shots for a while now, and with the 2019 iPhones, Apple is on equal footing with these other smartphone cameras. What is Night Mode? Night mode is an automatic setting which takes advantage of the new wide-angle camera that's in the ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro models. It's equipped with a larger sensor that is able to let in more light, allowing for brighter photos when the light is low. Night mode uses the new sensor along with machine learning and the Neural Engine in the A13 processor to create Night mode shots. When Night mode is engaged, the cameras in the iPhone analyze the available amount of light and then the iPhone chooses the number of frames needed to create a suitable image. The camera then takes a series of images for a set amount of time, such as one second, three seconds, five seconds, or in some situations, even longer. The images are taken at different exposures, some with longer exposures and

Sign in with Apple: What It Is and How It Works

Apple in iOS 13 introduced a new Sign in with Apple feature, which is designed to let you create accounts for apps and websites using your Apple ID, so you don't have to give away your personal information. Sign in with Apple is an alternative to the existing sign in with Google and Facebook options that apps and websites often offer. Apple's version protects your privacy and even lets you mask your email address. How Sign in with Apple Works In an app that supports Sign in with Apple, there's a "Continue with Apple" option that you'll see when asked to create an account. Tapping "Continue with Apple" explains that the feature is designed to let you sign into websites with the Apple ID that you already have. Developers don't see your Apple ID and are only provided with your name and your email address, though there is also an option to hide your email address if desired. Apps and websites get no personally identifiable information from you. When you use the feature, apps receive a unique identifier that is distinct for each developer, so there's no cross-platform or cross-app tracking available. With Sign in with Apple, developers and websites have no way of gathering information about you beyond the name that you provide and your email address, unless it's hidden. Hiding Your Email Address When using Sign in with Apple, you can provide developers and websites with your email address, or you can use a hidden email address assigned by Apple that will then forward incoming correspondence to your real email address. If you choose to use your real

Eight iOS 13 Tips to Get You Started

Apple today released iOS 13, the newest version of the software that's designed to run on the iPhone. Apple's yearly software updates always bring long lists of new features and changes that can make your iPhone feel like a foreign device. New updates can be intimidating, but installing them is often worthwhile because Apple's updates make sure your devices are safe, up to date, and have the latest feature improvements. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. If you're worried about performance taking a hit on older devices, rest assured that Apple has made an effort in both iOS 12 and ‌iOS 13‌ to make older devices more efficient. In ‌iOS 13‌, Face ID is faster, apps launch up to twice as fast, and are, in general smaller in size for quicker downloads and updates. We're going to jump start you with the what you need to know to get up and running with ‌iOS 13‌ right away with these ‌iOS 13‌ tips: 1. Try Out Dark Mode Your iPhone isn't going to look too much different when you install ‌iOS 13‌, with one exception - a new dark theme that's available if you enable it. Apple will ask you if you want to turn on ‌Dark Mode‌ when you first update your iPhone to ‌iOS 13‌, and if you do opt to turn it on, prepare for everything from apps to the Home screen to shift to a darker shade. ‌Dark Mode‌ is one of those features that iOS users have wanted for ages, and it's great if you have eyes sensitive to light or want a darker theme for your apps at night. Most Apple apps, like Mail, Messages, Health, Reminders, the App Store, Apple Music, and more have dark

iPhone 11 vs. iPhone 11 Pro Differences Compared

Apple's latest iPhones, the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro, are nearing their release dates on September 20. Apple is separating the new smartphones into its usual low-cost versus high-cost categories, with big differences between the two models coming down to the camera, display, and battery life. Slight Design Differences Although they look very similar, the ‌iPhone 11‌ is made with an aluminum frame and both the front and back are made of glass. The ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ has the same glass build as the ‌iPhone 11‌, but with a premium matte finish on the back of the device. Instead of an aluminum frame, its frame is made of stainless steel. For all three 2019 iPhones, Apple claims that its glass is the "toughest glass found in a smartphone," and promises durability if you happen to drop or otherwise accidentally harm your iPhone. For both smartphones, the square camera bump has a polished glass finish. The ‌iPhone 11‌ is 5.94 inches tall, 2.98 inches wide, and 0.33 inches thick, with a weight of 6.84 ounces. The ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ is ever slightly smaller at 5.67 inches tall, 2.81 inches wide, and 0.32 inches thick, with a weight of 6.63 ounces. Of course, the iPhone 11 Pro Max is the biggest of the bunch at 6.22 inches tall, 3.06 inches wide, and 0.32 inches deep, at a total weight of 7.97 ounces. The ‌iPhone 11‌ comes in Purple, Yellow, Green, Black, White, and Product Red. The ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ comes in Midnight Green, Silver, Space Grey, and Gold. All models have the same front-face notch, bezels, antenna bands, volume and side buttons, mute switch, speaker grills,

iPhone 11 vs. iPhone XR: Differences Compared

Apple this week unveiled the iPhone 11, the successor to the iPhone XR. At first glance, the two devices have quite a few similarities, but the ‌iPhone 11‌ takes a step forward in regards to cameras, battery life, and more. Design Very Similar The ‌iPhone 11‌ has a very similar glass-and-aluminum design as the ‌iPhone XR‌, with one major visual difference being its new dual-lens rear camera system housed in a large, square camera bump. On the back of the ‌iPhone 11‌, the Apple logo has been centered, and the "iPhone" brand name is no longer shown. Otherwise, much is the same, including the display, bezels, notch, antenna bands, volume and side buttons, mute switch, speaker grilles, and microphones. The ‌iPhone 11‌ also sticks with the Lightning connector. The ‌iPhone 11‌ comes in six colors, including all-new green and purple and slightly tweaked white, black, yellow, and (PRODUCT)RED options. Both devices weigh in at just under half a pound and have identical dimensions. Displays Same The ‌iPhone 11‌ has the same 6.1-inch LCD as the ‌iPhone XR‌, including a resolution of 1792×828 pixels for 326 pixels per inch, 625 nits max brightness, and True Tone and P3 wide color gamut support. The LCD panel keeps costs down compared to the OLED display in the iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max. Like the ‌iPhone XR‌, the ‌iPhone 11‌ relies on software-based Haptic Touch for contextual menus and shortcuts. Unlike older iPhones, there is no pressure-sensitive 3D Touch layer built into the ‌iPhone 11‌'s display. Performance Differences The ‌iPhone 11‌ is powered by Apple's latest

What to Expect at Apple's September 2019 Event: New iPhones, Apple Watch Models, Services Updates and More

Apple will hold its annual iPhone-centric event at the Steve Jobs Theater on the Apple Park campus on Tuesday, September 10. This year's theme is "By innovation only," which is the line that was on the invitations sent out to members of the media in late August. This year's event will feature new iPhones with some of the best camera improvements that we've seen from Apple in years, Apple Watch models in new materials, and perhaps some other hardware and services updates. Below, we've outlined everything that we're expecting to see or might see at Apple's 2019 event. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. 2019 iPhone Lineup The 2019 iPhone lineup is going to look a lot like the 2018 lineup, with Apple planning to continue offering three iPhones in 5.8, 6.5, and 6.1-inch sizes. The former two devices, which are successors to the iPhone XS and XS Max, will have OLED displays, while the iPhone XR successor will continue to feature an LCD display to keep costs lower. We don't yet know for sure what Apple is going to name its newest iPhones given the names of the previous-generation devices, but "iPhone 11" and "iPhone 11 Pro" are names that have been speculated for two of the devices. According to Bloomberg, while the upcoming iPhones will look similar to the current models, they're going to be made from a more shatter resistant glass that's also matte instead of glossy. When it comes to the ‌iPhone XR‌, it may be available in new colors, including lavender and green. Better waterproofing is expected, which will also make the new

Health and Activity: Complete Guide to iOS 13

Apple added new features and new functionality to most of its built-in apps, including Health and Activity, both of which have either changed significantly or have major new features worth noting. This guide goes over the changes that Apple made to the Health app and the Activity app in iOS 13. Health App Summary Apple in ‌iOS 13‌ entirely overhauled the Health app, doing away with the iOS 12 interface which featured four tabs for the "Today" calendar, "Health Data," "Sources," and "Medical ID." The main Health interface now features just two tabs: Summary and Browse. Summary is an overview of all of your different health metrics, which are going to vary based on what health-related devices you have and how you use them. If you have an Apple Watch, for example, you'll see data like activity, heart rate, heart rate variability, stand hours, stand minutes, steps, and tons more. Other devices, like the Beddit sleep monitor, smart scales, blood pressure monitors, and anything else that connects to the Health app can also be displayed here. To edit what's in the "Summary" tab," tap on the "Edit" button and tap the stars next to the categories that you want to be able to see. Highlights The Summary app has a "Highlights" section that tells you relevant and interesting information that you might want to know like average workout minutes over the last seven days, heart rate recovery, average steps walked per day, environmental sound levels, and more. Get More From Health If you scroll down to the end of the Summary section in the Health app, you will

Reminders: Complete Guide to iOS 13

The Reminders app has never been one of the most popular built-in apps, mostly due to its limited functionality in comparison with other reminder and to-do apps available from the App Store. In iOS 13, Apple overhauled the interface of the Reminders app, adding a new look and new capabilities that may encourage more people to check it out. In this guide, we'll go over all of the new features in the Reminders app and what it can do in ‌iOS 13‌ and iPadOS. Design Reminders in iOS 12 and earlier offered a simple no-frills list-style view that organized items by list, but ‌iOS 13‌ has an entirely new interface that's more intuitive. There are four main Reminders sections, which incorporate all of your reminders across all of your lists so you can see everything that you need to do in one view, whether it's for work or family. There's a "Today" section for reminders that need to be addressed immediately, a "Scheduled" section for reminders that have a date attached, an "All" section for viewing everything all at once, and a "Flagged" section for your reminders that have a flag added to separate them out. Along with the four main sections where you can access all of your reminders organized into different views, you can also see your content organized per list using the "My Lists" section. You can use Reminders in either dark mode or light mode, and there are unique looks for both. Lists and Reminders As with the previous version of Reminders, you can make as many lists as you need in the Reminders app. You can have separate lists for family, friends, work,

Safari: Complete Guide to iOS 13

Safari is one of the most important apps on the iPhone and iPad, allowing iOS users to access the web on their devices. Safari is one of the apps that routinely gets updated when new versions of iOS are released, and iOS 13 is no exception. Safari in ‌iOS 13‌ offers a whole range of useful updates, from an updated start page to a new download manager. Below, we walk through all of the new and important features in Safari in ‌iOS 13‌. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Revamped Start Page Safari in ‌iOS 13‌ has a revamped start page (the page that's available when you open a new Safari window or tab) that now incorporates Siri Suggestions and other features. The start page includes access to your favorite websites as usual, but ‌Siri‌ Suggestions will also surface relevant websites in your browsing history along with frequently visited sites, links sent to you in the Messages app, and more. The new start page is designed to let you get to what most interests you quickly, and it makes sure you don't forget to check out websites recommended to you by friends and family. How to Customize Your Favorite Sites in Safari for iOS How to Delete Frequently Visited Sites From Safari's Start Page in iOSWebsite View Menu In the Smart Search field where you can search or type in URLs, there's a new icon on the left denoted by two As. Tapping on this icon opens up the new Website View menu, where you can access the following controls: Text Size Options - Adjust the size of the text on the website you're on. Enable Reader View - Enable