Foxconn Reportedly Nearing Decision to Invest in Display Factory in Wisconsin
Jul 24, 2017 5:21 am PDT by Joe Rossignol
Taiwanese electronics manufacturer Foxconn is nearing a decision to invest in Wisconsin, and could hold an event in Washington, D.C. as soon as this week to discuss its U.S. investment plans, according to The Wall Street Journal.


Foxconn is one of Apple's primary iPhone assemblers in China, but in Wisconsin, the company is initially looking at producing display panels that can be used in large-screen electronics like televisions, according to the report.

The report, citing two people allegedly familiar with the plans, said Foxconn is also looking in the Detroit area for a possible factory.

Last month, Foxconn chairman Terry Gou confirmed that Foxconn is interested in investing at least $10 billion towards U.S. manufacturing in seven states: Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Texas.

Foxconn's display factory in Wisconsin will reportedly cost at least $7 billion. Gou said it could create tens of thousands of American jobs.

Earlier, Gou confirmed Apple is willing to invest in the facility, suggesting the Wisconsin plant could eventually also be used to manufacture smaller displays for products like iPhones, iPads, and MacBooks.

Foxconn has reportedly been in talks with U.S. government officials for several months over the facility, including House Speaker Paul Ryan, a Republican who represents a district in southeastern Wisconsin.

Gou said Foxconn will work closely with Japanese display maker Sharp, which it acquired last year, on its U.S. investment plans.

Rumors suggesting Foxconn might open its first U.S. factory began circulating last November, after Apple reportedly asked its suppliers Foxconn and Pegatron to look into the feasibility of producing iPhones in the United States.

Tag: Foxconn

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15 months ago
Regarding the tens of thousands of jobs, I would expect that's the creative accounting these project always receive where the guy who drops off the portable toilets to the job site for six months (and already had a job) is counted in that number but there will be very few people working in what will be a highly automated factory when it's complete. I'm a fan of automation in manufacturing, just trying to dampen the hype for what will ultimately be relatively few new jobs.
Rating: 8 Votes
15 months ago
As others have noted and as an owner of a Wisconsin manufacturing company myself, there is ZERO chance this factory will employ 10,000 people. They're undoubtably counting thousands of people who will work in logistics outside of the factory, plus short-term construction and infrastructure jobs needed to build the plant that will go away once it's up and running. Not complaining about adding another manufacturer to the state, but it will have very little effect on the jobs market in the state. My guess is that they'll likely hire from a pool of people that also includes skilled workers from as far away as Rockford to the southwest and Chicago to the south, so not all jobs will even go to Wisconsin residents.
Rating: 6 Votes
15 months ago

God Emperor Trump will be pleased.

He will get credit even though the linked article said Apple asked them in June 2016
Rating: 6 Votes
15 months ago

Haha...California didn't make the list. Wonder why?


Because Wisconsin has an economy, state government, and job market that's the closest to a third-world country?
Rating: 5 Votes
15 months ago
God Emperor Trump will be pleased.
Rating: 3 Votes
15 months ago
Haha...California didn't make the list. Wonder why?
Rating: 3 Votes
15 months ago

Because Wisconsin has an economy, state government, and job market that's the closest to a third-world country?

Illinois has been destroyed ...California is next, businesses are moving out https://cei.org/blog/nestl%C3%A9-other-businesses-flee-california. Even so called 3rd world countries are in the position to snatch something from California. Wisconsin's unemployment rate is 3.2%, there is a shortage of workers but still foxconn is choosing them...California should ask. why?
Rating: 2 Votes
15 months ago
No amount of jobs gained over the coming 5-10 years will offset the amount lost to automation, etc. The times are changing and thats just the reality.
Rating: 2 Votes
15 months ago

Regarding the tens of thousands of jobs, I would expect that's the creative accounting these project always receive where the guy who drops off the portable toilets to the job site for six months (and already had a job) is counted in that number but there will be very few people working in what will be a highly automated factory when it's complete. I'm a fan of automation in manufacturing, just trying to dampen the hype for what will ultimately be relatively few new jobs.

I get what you are saying, some jobs would be temporary but they are still work jobs. Off the top of my head possible jobs that would need to be done.
New construction or updating existing site.
Architect, concrete, steele, wood, drywall, plumbers, electricians, landscapers, painters, and of course inspectors. People needed to make those needed supplies plus the people to get them to the site. Of course the folks who use those materials onsite.
Someone has to create the machines that will make the product. Then you get to the long term workers. The machine workers, the shipping and receiving department, maintenance personnel along with custodial workers. Some trucking company will have additional work as well. Then throw in the management people with the possible public outreach social media public relation group. Finally, there needs to be a waste management addition. All additional work that was not needed without the new plant.
Rating: 2 Votes
15 months ago
OK, so we build the panels here and them them overseas for assembly and then ship the completed units back to the states. Even if they build the phones here, where are they going to get the mass work forces required.
Rating: 2 Votes

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