Apple Says New Piazza Liberty Store in Milan, Italy With Waterfall Entrance is Coming Soon
May 15, 2017 6:50 am PDT by Joe Rossignol
Apple today announced that it will soon open a new retail store at Piazza Liberty, or Liberty Square, in Milan, Italy.


As revealed in city planning documents earlier this year, the store will be located entirely below the outdoor amphitheater. The sales floor will be accessible by walking down a staircase situated between two waterfalls that form part of the larger fountain. There will also be an elevator available.

Apple is developing the store in partnership with architecture firm Foster and Partners, who have helped design many of the company's most significant retail spaces around the world and its new Apple Park headquarters.


Apple's retail chief Angela Ahrendts wants Apple Stores to be more of community gathering places, rather than just a place to buy the latest iPhone or iPad. As part of those plans, Apple Piazza Liberty will be an open space for all to "have a break, be with friends, and discover new interests."

The store will feature Apple's next-generation retail design with indoor trees and a large screen for "Today at Apple" sessions and other events.

(Thanks, setteBIT!)

Related Roundup: Apple Stores
Tag: Italy

Top Rated Comments

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10 months ago

So when you are evaluating which tech product to buy, where does "the maker invests in stunning architecture" fit into the priorities for a decision?


It doesn't.

You would need to have an awareness of art history and architecture over hundreds/thousands of years in order to understand my comment. To help foster that awareness, you might consider enrolling in a few art history classes at the local junior college.
Rating: 26 Votes
10 months ago
Beautiful. Happy to see Apple continuing to invest in stunning architecture.
Rating: 14 Votes
10 months ago

Beautiful. Happy to see Apple continuing to invest in stunning architecture.


So when you are evaluating which tech product to buy, where does "the maker invests in stunning architecture" fit into the priorities for a decision?
Rating: 12 Votes
10 months ago

So when you are evaluating which tech product to buy, where does "the maker invests in stunning architecture" fit into the priorities for a decision?


How is this a bad thing? It doesn't need to affect the decision of buying the product. It's just... nice.

Insufferable. Perhaps you should study the last few decades of the tech industry and how Apple has become the masters of marketing. No college courses required.


Marketing or not, how is a new Apple Store which conforms to existing architecture a bad thing?
Rating: 12 Votes
10 months ago

It doesn't.

You would need to have an awareness of art history and architecture over hundreds/thousands of years in order to understand my comment. To help foster that awareness, you might consider enrolling in a few art history classes at the local junior college.


Insufferable. Perhaps you should study the last few decades of the tech industry and how Apple has become the masters of marketing. No college courses required.
Rating: 10 Votes
10 months ago
Nice. Probably financed with the price increase on the MacBook Pro :p
Rating: 8 Votes
10 months ago
I can't be the only one who read this as "Pizza Liberty", can I?
Rating: 6 Votes
10 months ago
Why would we use shops, even Apple shops, as community gathering places? Are they going to have chairs and tables with no Apple products on, and start selling food and drink?

Ooh, like that ancient Apple cyber cafe concept we saw pictures of a while back?
Rating: 5 Votes
10 months ago
Apple stores won't be a destination for most if they continue to be stingy with floor space. They have the highest revenue per square foot in the industry. I've been to a couple of their stores (the only ones near me are a couple of hours in either direction and are like concrete shoeboxes), and there's no way you could focus in a class. The stores are tiny and packed. I once brought my MBP in because the fan was loud, and to talk to the Genius we had to yell back and forth to hear each other. There was no way he could hear the fan noise. I didn't see where they could possibly conduct their movie, photo, etc. classes. I didn't even see how you could buy a product. It was like Mardi Gras in there. I've never seen prostitutes (that I'm aware of), but my dad who was with me told me he thought a number of the people who were standing around were prostitutes or at least looking for a date. I can't speak to that. But it was packed to the gills.

Somehow, Best Buy has a store a few minutes from me, it's gigantic, and it's a ghost town. Same with Dick's sporting goods. I went in there once and I think there were more employees than customers. I can see how that doesn't make good business sense, but Apple's experience is terrible. I guess it's good for the same people who like going to Times Square on NYE, but that's not me.
Rating: 4 Votes
10 months ago
Now instead of 'Store', it will be a Retail Gathering Place. Too bad they have no new products to sell.

Yes, I know, there are opportunities for new converts, but their upgrades are just too darn far apart.
Rating: 4 Votes

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