Apple Stops Signing iOS 10.2.1 and iOS 10.3

Following the release of iOS 10.3.1 on April 3, Apple has stopped signing iOS 10.2.1 and iOS 10.3, earlier versions of iOS that were previously available to consumers before the latest update was released.

Customers who have upgraded to iOS 10.3.1 will no longer be able to downgrade their devices to iOS 10.2.1 or iOS 10.3.

Apple routinely stops signing older versions of software updates after new releases come out in order to encourage customers to stay up to date.

iOS 10.3.1 is now the only version of iOS 10 that can be installed on iOS devices by the general public, but developers and public beta testers can also download iOS 10.3.2, a future update that is currently being beta tested.


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19 months ago


Apple routinely stops signing older versions of software updates after new releases come out in order to encourage customers to stay up to date.


Stopping signing the last version after 1 week is ridiculous. It should be in the 3-12 month range and/or some reasonable number of point updates.

I'm all for encouraging updates, but Apple has gotten downright hostile about being on THE latest version between this and the update nag screens that try to trick people into updating.
Rating: 13 Votes
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19 months ago

Stopping signing the last version after 1 week is ridiculous. It should be in the 3-12 month range and/or some reasonable number of point updates.

I'm all for encouraging updates, but Apple has gotten downright hostile about being on THE latest version between this and the update nag screens that try to trick people into updating.


Fixes a wifi flaw allowing malicious people to send code to your phone and execute it, you don't want to be running 10.3.
Rating: 10 Votes
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19 months ago

Stopping signing the last version after 1 week is ridiculous. It should be in the 3-12 month range and/or some reasonable number of point updates.

I'm all for encouraging updates, but Apple has gotten downright hostile about being on THE latest version between this and the update nag screens that try to trick people into updating.


Because the newest update patched some major security issues, I could definitely understand why Apple has decided to stop signing the original 10.3. I don't see a reason to keep adding to the liability. I'd rather it be this way.
Rating: 6 Votes
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19 months ago

I'm still waiting to be able to restore devices that no longer receive updates to whatever version of iOS they can support. Apple has no argument against it.

Actually they do, money.
As older devices are upgraded to new iOS versions, they slow down, forcing users to upgrade their device. Try running an iPhone 5 in iOS 10 vs iOS 6. They don't want you to downgrade to have a smooth experience with your current device, they want you to spend more money on their devices.
Rating: 4 Votes
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19 months ago
I'm still waiting to be able to restore devices that no longer receive updates to whatever version of iOS they can support. Apple has no valid argument against it.
Rating: 4 Votes
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19 months ago

The argument of better security still applies. Sure, it's not the "best" security since they can't get the latest updates, but being on the last available update for the device is still "better" security than being on any previous update for that device that doesn't have the additional security fixes that are from later updates.

Shouldn't the customer decide if they want that?
Rating: 3 Votes
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19 months ago

Actually they do, money.
As older devices are upgraded to new iOS versions, they slow down, forcing users to upgrade their device. Try running an iPhone 5 in iOS 10 vs iOS 6. They don't want you to downgrade to have a smooth experience with your current device, they want you to spend more money on their devices.

From a customer's perspective that is NOT a valid argument.
Rating: 3 Votes
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19 months ago

Because the newest update patched some major security issues, I could definitely understand why Apple has decided to stop signing the original 10.3. I don't see a reason to keep adding to the liability. I'd rather it be this way.


You say that like it is only this release that this has happened. It has been EVERY release for easily the last two years.
Rating: 3 Votes
Avatar
19 months ago

Stopping signing the last version after 1 week is ridiculous. It should be in the 3-12 month range and/or some reasonable number of point updates.

I'm all for encouraging updates, but Apple has gotten downright hostile about being on THE latest version between this and the update nag screens that try to trick people into updating.

It sounds really good at the keynotes when Tim compares adoption rates to Android.
Rating: 3 Votes
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19 months ago
Something to keep in mind is that 10.3 changes the file system from HFS+ to APFS, so downgrading is a worse idea than it usually was.
Rating: 3 Votes
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