Apple's ConnectED Program Has Helped Over 32,000 Students
Aug 10, 2016 1:37 pm PDT by Juli Clover
Apple today announced that its ConnectED program, which saw the company donating $100 million in products to schools and teachers across the country, has impacted the lives of more than 30,000 students.

As of the 2016-2017 school year, there are 32,145 students at underserved public schools who have received iPads from Apple to bolster their education. Teachers have received more than 9,042 Macs and iPads and Apple has helped to install 189 miles of internet cable in schools.


Along with equipment, Apple sends Professional Learning Specialists to schools around the country to help administrators, teachers, and students get the most out of the technology.

The latest school to join Apple's ConnectED program is the Carver Elementary School in Indianola, Mississippi, the 66th ConnectED school. Carver Elementary School has 701 students, all whom now have iPads with educational-focused apps to work with.

Apple joined ConnectED, a $750 million corporate educational initiative announced by President Obama, in 2014 and has since remained committed to providing underserved schools with cutting edge classroom equipment. Other companies involved in the ConnectED initiative include AT&T, Verizon, and Microsoft.


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8 months ago
hate to be a negative nancy, but when I worked in higher ed the schools we threw money and ipads at ended up calling it a waste of time and money. You can't just throw tech at a problem and expect it will fix itself.
Rating: 7 Votes
8 months ago
Indianola, Ive been their, very small town in the middle of cotton fields. Providing Professional Learning Specialists is the key for initiatives like this to work. Good work!
Rating: 2 Votes
8 months ago
$3,110.90 per student.
Rating: 2 Votes
8 months ago
underserved public schools? sounds like the tax system isn't working right since they fund the crap public school system. and who suffers? the kids, good for apple to help.
Rating: 2 Votes
8 months ago

hate to be a negative nancy, but when I worked in higher ed the schools we threw money and ipads at ended up calling it a waste of time and money. You can't just throw tech at a problem and expect it will fix itself.

I know LA district schools had been facing these kind of issues....so i hear you.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

hate to be a negative nancy, but when I worked in higher ed the schools we threw money and ipads at ended up calling it a waste of time and money. You can't just throw tech at a problem and expect it will fix itself.

Saw that as well. The teachers that were expected to integrate the technology in their classrooms and lessons need to be taught techniques and be provided practical lesson plan examples of how to utilize the new tools. It is also helpful for them to view demonstrations of the technology use cases.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago
"...32,145 students at underserved public schools..."

That's a staggering 0.064% of the ~50,100,000 US K-12 population.

This program is noting more than feel-good window dressing, and a waste of citizen tax dollars. It is also a waste of Apple sales and marketing resources.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

hate to be a negative nancy, but when I worked in higher ed the schools we threw money and ipads at ended up calling it a waste of time and money. You can't just throw tech at a problem and expect it will fix itself.


Steve Jobs himself said almost the exact same when interviewed about classroom technology in the 90's. No amount of fancy toys will make up for a lack of a strong curriculum and good teachers.

And he was also a white board fundamentalist when it came to his own group sessions.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago
This program will and is creating a large number of participants of the apple eco-system. This will increase the likelihood of future loyal customers that will spend lots of money buying apple products and services. This program will have long term positive consequences on apple's profit.
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underserved public schools? sounds like the tax system isn't working right since they fund the crap public school system. and who suffers? the kids, good for apple to help.

Public schools in the United States do not get to pick and choose the students they are required to teach. They have to teach the high-achieving gifted child as well as the developmentally-disabled child. Public schools are dependent on taxes raised from local property taxes and hope for additional funds from the state. If the school is in a poor area, there is not likely to be wealthy parents that can fund a PTA that pays for funding short-falls that cover for paper for handouts or up to date text books. Unlike many other nations, adults talk about educators with disrespect and contempt that is then passed onto their children that makes it very challenging for the teachers to then manage and teach those little monsters. Adults need to bread less so that there will be fewer children that are required to be taught and fewer children in the classroom to manage and educate.
Rating: 1 Votes
8 months ago

hate to be a negative nancy, but when I worked in higher ed the schools we threw money and ipads at ended up calling it a waste of time and money. You can't just throw tech at a problem and expect it will fix itself.


Yup. Complete waste of taxpayer money.

http://www.macrumors.com/2015/04/15/la-school-district-ipad-deal-refund/


This is the reason Apple included a minimum of 17 days of professional development to help make sound tech integrations into their instruction.


Where was Apple and their "professional development" when the LAUSD paid millions of dollars to equip their students with iPads?

From http://www.macrumors.com/2015/04/15/la-school-district-ipad-deal-refund/ :

When the school district entered into a contract with Apple, it paid approximately $768 per iPad, which included approximately $200 towards a three-year license for math and English curriculum from Pearson that was meant to replace many textbooks and other learning tools. The materials went largely unused by the district due to technical problems and the quality of the software.

"As you are aware, LAUSD is extremely dissatisfied with the work of Pearson," according to an April 13 letter signed by general counsel David Holmquist. "While Apple and Pearson promised a state-of-the-art technological solution ... they have yet to deliver it."

Despite demands to fix the problem, the letter said that "the vast majority of our students are still unable to access the Pearson curriculum on iPads."
Rating: 1 Votes

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