battery life

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'battery life' How Tos

How to Save Battery Life in iOS 9 With Low Power Mode

One frequent complaint of smartphone users is the limited amount of battery life our tech devices have. With the constant trend toward making devices thinner and lighter, battery life is a key tradeoff to be considered, and some users find their devices not lasting as long as they'd prefer. For those pushing their devices to the limit, Apple has added a new feature to iOS 9 that is designed to help you conserve those last few drops of juice when you wont be able to charge your iPhone anytime soon. The new feature is known as Low Power Mode, and it can increase your battery life up to three hours but at the expense of some functions of your device. It is only available on iPhone devices running iOS 9. Enabling Low Power Mode only takes a few steps. Open the Settings app on your iPhone. Select Battery from the menu list. Toggle Low Power Mode to the On position. The battery icon will turn yellow to indicate that you are using Low Power Mode. Low Power Mode reduces your iPhone's performance and cuts out some background activities. For example, mail must be fetched manually, background app refresh is disabled, and motion and brightness are reduced. Benchmarks have shown the iPhone's CPU performance with Low Power Mode on is significantly reduced in an effort to save on power consumption, so while simple tasks may continue to work just fine on an iPhone in Low Power Mode, more demanding ones may become sluggish. You don't have to keep Low Power Mode on all of the time; you can manually shut it off whenever you want. However, the general impression of

'battery life' Articles

'iPhone 6c' Said to Have Slightly Larger Battery Than iPhone 5s and 2GB of RAM

Apple's so-called "iPhone 6c" will have a 1,642 mAh battery, slightly larger than the iPhone 5s battery's 1,570 mAh capacity, according to Chinese website MyDrivers [Google Translate] (via Gadgetz Arena). The report, citing "insider Foxconn employees," also corroborates multiple rumors claiming the 4-inch iPhone will feature an A9 processor, 2GB of RAM, 16GB base storage, Touch ID and the same 2.5d curved glass used on the iPhone 6 and later. Apple's suppliers will reportedly begin mass production of the much-rumored smartphone in January ahead of a possible March announcement and subsequent April release. At least five sources have now predicted the "iPhone 6c" will launch in early 2016 since rumors about the device began circulating this year. In November, often-reliable Japanese blog Mac Otakara reported that Apple has developed a new 4-inch iPhone that is essentially an iPhone 5s with sixth-generation iPod touch features, including an A8 chip, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.1 and an improved FaceTime HD camera with ƒ/2.2 aperture. The "iPhone 6c" may also come in at least three colors and lack 3D Touch

Apple's 3D Touch Video Confirms 1715 mAh iPhone 6s Battery

Last month, rumors and photos of a battery that looked very similar to an iPhone battery suggested that the iPhone 6s' battery capacity would be lower than the iPhone 6's. Today at Apple's "Hey Siri" event, a video that showed off 3D Touch revealed the iPhone 6's battery capacity. In the video the iPhone 6s is dismantled and viewers can see that the battery is marked "1715 mAh". This confirms previous rumors, which have said that the iPhone 6s' battery capacity would be down to 1715 mAh from the iPhone 6's 1810 mAh. Rumors also indicated that the iPhone 6s Plus would see its capacity drop down to 2750 mAh from the iPhone 6 Plus' 2910 mAh. While the iPhone 6s Plus' true battery capacity is currently unconfirmed, confirmation of a lower capacity will likely come in the next few weeks as the device is subject to teardowns and technical breakdowns. It's likely the smaller battery size is due to multiple factors. Despite the smaller battery capacity, Apple’s stated battery life for the iPhone 6s remains the same as for the iPhone 6, indicating battery efficiency has been improved in the new model. Additionally, the new Taptic Engine takes up a significant amount of space that had previously been devoted to battery, meaning the Cupertino company had to cut down the battery size to compensate. Thanks Brandon!

AppleCare+ for iPhone, iPad, iPod and Apple Watch Now Covers Batteries That Retain Less Than 80% of Original Capacity

Apple has updated the terms of its AppleCare+ Protection Plan for iPhone, iPad, iPod and Apple Watch to cover batteries that retain less than 80% of their original capacity within the extended warranty period, whereas it previously covered batteries that retained less than 50% of their original capacity. The change applies to AppleCare+ purchased for iPhone, iPad, iPod and all Apple Watch models on April 10, 2015 or later. Apple will replace defective batteries that do not live up to the 80% specification free of charge as long as the device is within its AppleCare+ coverage period. Otherwise, the iPhone maker charges $79 for out-of-warranty battery service for all Apple Watch batteries that retain less than 80% of their original capacity per Apple's diagnostic testing, plus a $6.95 shipping charge if required. The new battery terms of AppleCare+ for iPhone, iPad, iPod and Apple Watch:"If during the Plan Term, you submit a valid claim by notifying Apple that (i) a defect in materials and workmanship has arisen in the Covered Equipment, or (ii) the capacity of the Covered Equipment’s battery to hold an electrical charge is less than eighty percent (80%) of its original specifications, Apple will either (A) repair the defect at no charge, using new parts or parts that are equivalent to new in performance and reliability, or (B) exchange the Covered Equipment, with a replacement product that is new or equivalent to new in performance and reliability."AppleCare+ for iPhone, iPad and iPod AppleCare+ for iPhone extends the smartphone's warranty coverage to two years

Apple Watch Fulfills Promise of All-Day Battery Life in Early Reviews

Apple lifted the embargo for large websites to publish their Apple Watch reviews this morning, providing us with detailed insight about various functions of the device. Battery life in particular has been one area of interest for several prospective Apple Watch buyers, and most early reviews found the Apple Watch to fulfill its promise of all-day battery life on a single charge. Well-known tech journalist Joanna Stern of The Wall Street Journal offers one of the better looks at the Apple Watch's battery life in her video of using the device in day-to-day life. The video keeps track of how much battery life the Apple Watch uses while Stern goes about her daily routine in New York, with the device fully charged at 7:30 AM and having five percent remaining at just past midnight. Apple confirmed last month that the Apple Watch will have up to 18 hours of battery life with mixed usage, and last up to 72 hours in Power Reserve mode. Early reviews find the Apple Watch generally on par with, or falling slightly short of, those numbers based on articles published by Daring Fireball, The Verge, The Wall Street Journal, Techpinions and Re/code. We've compiled those findings in the roundup below. John Gruber, Daring Fireball:"After more than a week of daily use, Apple Watch has more than alleviated any concerns I had about getting through a day on a single charge. I noted the remaining charge when I went to bed each night. It was usually still in the 30s or 40s. Once it was still over 50 percent charged. Once, it was down to 27. And one day — last Thursday — it was all

Apple Watch Battery Life: 18 Hours Mixed Usage, Up to 72 Hours on Power Reserve

Apple has outlined specific information about Apple Watch battery life on its website, claiming that the wrist-worn device gets all-day battery life of 18 hours on a single charge based on mixed usage, and up to 72 hours in Power Reserve mode. The battery testing was conducted in March using a preproduction Apple Watch paired with an iPhone running preproduction software. Apple claims that the Apple Watch has battery life of up to 3 hours for talk time, 6.5 hours for audio playback over Bluetooth, up to 7 hours during a workout session with the heart rate sensor on and up to 48 hours for timekeeping. Apple Watch charging times are listed as about 1.5 hours from 0% to 80% and 2.5 hours from 0% to 100% using the included MagSafe inductive charger. Apple's claim of all-day battery life is based on using the Apple Watch for 90 time checks, 90 notifications, 45 minutes of app use, and a 30-minute workout with music playback via Bluetooth over the course of 18 hours. Apple used a 38mm Apple Watch for testing and claims that the 42mm will generally experience longer battery life. Additional magnetic chargers are available on Apple's bands and accessories page, costing $29 for a 1-meter cable and $39 for a 2-meter