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Intel's Upcoming Ultra-Fast Optane SSD May Come to MacBooks

Last summer, Intel announced 3D Xpoint, a new class of memory labeled as a "major breakthrough in memory process technology." 3D Xpoint is 1,000 times faster and more durable than NAND Flash storage, as well as 10 times denser than the DRAM chips used in computers.
The innovative, transistor-less cross point architecture creates a three-dimensional checkerboard where memory cells sit at the intersection of word lines and bit lines, allowing the cells to be addressed individually. As a result, data can be written and read in small sizes, leading to faster and more efficient read/write processes.
Intel has promised that the first 3D Xpoint (pronounced "crosspoint") product will be coming in early 2016 in the form of its Optane solid state drives, which may be of interest to Apple. According to Macworld, 3D Xpoint is compatible with NVM Express (NVMe), an SSD protocol that offers improved latency and performance over the older AHCI protocol.

intel3dxpoint
Apple's Retina MacBooks already use NVMe technology, and it's likely Skylake Macs set to be released across 2016 will also support NVMe. With NVMe compatibility built into 3D Xpoint, Apple could adopt Intel's Optane solid state drives for super fast performance speeds that significantly outpace what's possible with current SSDs. As Macworld points out, Apple is often an early adopter of emerging technology, having been the first company to implement Thunderbolt and chip technology from Intel.

While Intel is planning to make its Optane SSDs available in 2016, the technology is unlikely to see widespread adoption right away. 3D Xpoint storage solutions will likely exist alongside NAND Flash options until prices become affordable enough for use in mass-produced products. Intel is also working on Optane memory DIMMs.

If Apple does choose to use Intel's Optane SSDs in future Macs, it could be some time before Optane-equipped machines are available. Upgraded Macs that are expected in 2016 will likely continue to use NAND Flash, but as mentioned previously, speed improvements could come in the form of wider NVMe adoption.

Skylake chips appropriate for many of Apple's Macs are currently available or will be available in the near future, so we may begin seeing the the first Mac upgrades in the next few months, perhaps at Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference.



Top Rated Comments

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10 months ago

Apple's Retina MacBooks ('//www.macrumors.com/2015/04/11/nvme-mac-os-x/') already use NVMe technology, and it's likely Skylake Macs set to be released across 2016 will also support NVMe.


Except for iMacs, which will continue to use 5400rpm HDDs.
Rating: 102 Votes
10 months ago

Except for iMacs, which will continue to use 5400rpm HDDs.

Na. They’ll upgrade to 16GB of flash.
Rating: 27 Votes
10 months ago

Except for iMacs, which will continue to use 5400rpm HDDs.

Don't worry, I hear Apple is working with Intel to develop a 5400rpm Xpoint.
Rating: 25 Votes
10 months ago

Except for iMacs, which will continue to use 5400rpm HDDs.


"ENTITLED!!!1!"
"Stop being cheap!!"
"Apple doesn't owe you anything!"
"If you want better storage, simply pay more."

/s
Rating: 22 Votes
10 months ago

This is one of those things that just sounds insanely awesome. Hopefully it will be standard in all Macs...Or at least SSD be standard in all Macs.


Knowing Apple, it is probably going to be a pricey upgrade option.
Rating: 13 Votes
10 months ago

Apple is typically first to adopt Intels new stuff, so I can totally see the new MBP's utilizing this and TB3/USB3.1.


Hate to say it; but DDR4 gaming laptops, and workstations with 16-core Xeon chips, would refute that statement.
Rating: 11 Votes
10 months ago
This is one of those things that just sounds insanely awesome. Hopefully it will be standard in all Macs...Or at least SSD be standard in all Macs.
Rating: 11 Votes
10 months ago

iMacs come with flash SSD's, too. Stop being a troll.

The point is that they should ONLY come with them. Selling a "premium" product with a 5400rpm drive in 2016 is an embarrassment.
Rating: 9 Votes
10 months ago
Using this as RAM in smartphones will be a lot more groundbreaking than storage on Macbooks.

Think about it: Non-volatile main system memory.

No memory refreshing required when the phone is asleep. Saves standby power.

No need for separate flash memory. You'd have one giant 64GB or 128GB space used for both system memory and storage. It'd be the equivalent of having your entire system on a RAM disk, only nonvolatile. Apps will launch almost instantly even from a fresh boot.

If this tech is real and takes off, we're going to see a major jump in performance for both laptops/desktops and mobile devices. The difference between system RAM and storage will be blurred. Interesting times lay ahead.

Of course, I don't believe these things til I see them. The industry loves throwing this stuff out there to get investment dollars.
Rating: 8 Votes
10 months ago

Except for iMacs, which will continue to use 5400rpm HDDs.


Kinda pathetic saying the iPhone 6s uses a custom NVMe interface.
Rating: 6 Votes

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