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Hidden 'Indoor Survey' App Created by Apple Discovered on App Store

Apple last week quietly launched a new first-party app called Indoor Survey [Direct Link], which allows its users to map out the interior space of a building using their iPhone. Spotted by developer Steve Troughton-Smith yesterday evening, the app specifically uses radio frequency signals in concert with an iPhone's various sensor data to successfully map an interior location (via AppleInsider).

The app, however, doesn't appear to be entirely functional as of yet. When prompted with Indoor Survey's home menu, after entering an Apple ID and password, users will be met with an Authorization Failed message and be barred from further accessing the app's suggested indoor mapping abilities. The app is also briefly mentioned on a banner within Apple Maps Connect after signing in, asking users to sign up to the indoor mapping initiative if they represent a venue with a handful of attributes Apple is looking for.

Apple-Maps-Connect-Indoor
"Enable indoor positioning within a venue using the Indoor Survey app. By dropping 'points' on a map within the Survey App, you indicate your position within the venue as you walk through. As you do so, the indoor Survey App measures the radio frequency (RF) signal data and combines it with an iPhone's sensor data. The end result is indoor positioning without the need to install special hardware."
The new app could be the result of Apple's purchase of WifiSLAM in 2013. The indoor location company had developed a way for an app to detect someone's location within a building using Wi-Fi signals, which seems to be on par with Indoor Survey's abilities today. The technology is slightly similar to the company's iBeacons software it runs in all of its retail stores, which locates a user's iPhone when entering an Apple Store and updates them on various promotions, classes, and product information.

indoor survey app
Currently, Indoor Survey can't be found using the search function on the App Store and can only be discovered via iTunes directly. The app was last updated on October 27, so it had been on the App Store for at least a week before anyone discovered it. The app's description mentions requiring iOS 9 or later with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch compatibility and an 18MB download size.



Top Rated Comments

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11 months ago

I hate the way shopping malls are specifically designed to get the customer lost so as to supposedly increasing the chance of a serendipitous purchase or twelve. If this can help me navigate through new (to me) public spaces more easily than by consulting mall maps or asking for directions to mall cops, I for one would be grateful.


There is a reason:

Rating: 27 Votes
11 months ago
I hate the way shopping malls are specifically designed to get the customer lost so as to supposedly increasing the chance of a serendipitous purchase or twelve. If this can help me navigate through new (to me) public spaces more easily than by consulting mall maps or asking for directions to mall cops, I for one would be grateful.
Rating: 12 Votes
11 months ago
It may just be me, but all this mapping and tracking tech is giving me too much of an "Enemy of the State" vibe. :eek:;)
Rating: 10 Votes
11 months ago

Imagine being able to track your employees....


Many already do. When we built a new building back in 2005, we installed sensors within the walls throughout the $20 million building. Each employee needs a badge to get into the building. The sensors can then track that badge as you move throughout the building. Most don't even know they're being tracked.

It's fairly common for companies to do this.
Rating: 9 Votes
11 months ago
When we renovated our new offices, we put the original 1800's copper & tin ceiling back in after the work.
It's a spying, snooping, & tracking free zone.

...a nice way of saying no one can get a signal through it whatsoever.
Rating: 6 Votes
11 months ago

Many already do. When we built a new building back in 2005, we installed sensors within the walls throughout the $20 million building. Each employee needs a badge to get into the building. The sensors can then track that badge as you move throughout the building. Most don't even know they're being tracked.

It's fairly common for companies to do this.

That sucks. No job is worth being tracked all day like a colony of piss ants.
Rating: 5 Votes
11 months ago

I hate the way shopping malls are specifically designed to get the customer lost so as to supposedly increasing the chance of a serendipitous purchase or twelve. If this can help me navigate through new (to me) public spaces more easily than by consulting mall maps or asking for directions to mall cops, I for one would be grateful.


Microsoft Maps on Windows Phone 8.1 already lets you do that. There's even a drop down menu for the different levels and a directory.

Rating: 5 Votes
11 months ago

That sucks. No job is worth being tracked all day like a colony of piss ants.


It's also for the employee's good too.

For example, it detects an employee in an empty stairwell, motionless, for 2 minutes. Maybe the employee fell and needs help? This will help get emergency response to these people when something like that happens.
Rating: 3 Votes
11 months ago
When I glanced at the headline, I thought this was a hidden app that was to enable tracking for surveillance.

Guess I must be paranoid. Can't think why...
Rating: 3 Votes
11 months ago
This is a natural step for Maps and I can see it being used in Find my Friends.

iPhone 6 and later have a barometer so it would cool if elevation could be shown too somehow...
Rating: 3 Votes

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