Apple's Mac Pro Shipping Estimates in U.S. Move to 5-6 Weeks

Apple updated the shipping estimates for its new Mac Pro desktop, with the US store now providing a shipping target of 5 to 6 weeks for new orders with either stock or custom configurations. International stores still report April as an estimated ship date, but these dates are likely to change now that the month has officially started.

mac-pro-shipping
This is one of several recent changes Apple has made to Mac Pro shipping estimates, with the company showing both March and April shipping targets earlier this year. The change from a monthly window of approximately seven to eight weeks to a weekly window of five to six weeks suggests the company is starting to move toward a balance of supply and demand after the initial buying rush at launch.

We may hear more about the Mac Pro and its supply constraints later this month when Apple announces its earnings for the second fiscal quarter (first calendar quarter) of 2014. Apple will hold its quarterly earnings conference call on April 23 at 5:00 PM Eastern / 2:00 PM Pacific. MacRumors will provide coverage of both the earnings report and conference call at that time.

Top Rated Comments

(View all)

7 months ago
And people wonder why iPhones and iPads can't be produced in the states...
Rating: 10 Votes
7 months ago

This continues to be one of the stranger comments that pops up. Far more complicated things (manufacturing-wise) are made in far greater numbers in the US all the time.


like? I dont think the US has enough electronic engineers, let alone assembly line workers to fulfill the demands of 30 million iphones+ annually...
Rating: 3 Votes
7 months ago
That is a long lead time. Is it because Apple underestimated the demand for the new mac pros and the parts just aren't in the supply chain? Or is there a design or manufacturing issue that we don't know about?
Rating: 2 Votes
7 months ago
Apple's handling of this situation is very disappointing.
3 whole months after their 'Shipping announcement' (which already was regrettably late in the year) and they still can't manage better than 5-6 weeks in the country of origin, let alone internationally.

Very disappointing indeed. :(
Rating: 2 Votes
7 months ago

And people wonder why iPhones and iPads can't be produced in the states...


Because we don't have manufacturing plants with thousands of trained workers ready to take on any job and ramp up in a week?
Rating: 2 Votes
7 months ago

This continues to be one of the stranger comments that pops up. Far more complicated things (manufacturing-wise) are made in far greater numbers in the US all the time.


Far more complicated things... Yes. I work in Aerospace & Defense.
Far greater numbers... Not really. Low rates, very high price, although that's not directly related to costs. :)
Rating: 2 Votes
7 months ago

Is it bad I don't really care where my Apple products are made?
Sure I want worker conditions to be better and labor laws, but the United States has plenty of low end/uneducated jobs, our issue is we don't have educated people to fill all our higher end/bachelors + masters jobs.

We are a developed rich nation, we should not still need these manufacturing jobs.


You missed exactly the area of job that manufacturing outsourcing obliterated, and that's the middle class. Manufacturing plants in America used to be the foundation of middle class jobs. And as manufacturing jobs have left America, so has the middle class. The divide between rich and poor keeps growing, and that's not sustainable from an economic or sociological standpoint. There are seven times as many Americans on food stamps now as there were in 2000.

You say that we are a "developed, rich nation", but a nation needs to export goods to keep trade with other countries in balance. We cannot survive long-term with an economy based mostly on consuming things that are made elsewhere. There is also the notion that America can continue being prosperous by innovating ideas and virtual goods, such as tech companies like Google and Facebook, but the NSA has destroyed that trust in American internet companies. Moreover, these tech companies don't create many middle class jobs the way manufacturing companies did in the past.

Not having enough educated people to fill bachelors + masters jobs is a fallacy created by industries that want to import cheaper labor via H1B visas. There are plenty of young American graduates for whom there is no job.

In total, we need every manufacturing job we can get. Whether it's "bad" that you don't care is solely on you, but from my perspective I am proud to see Apple again making products that say "Assembled in the USA".
Rating: 2 Votes
7 months ago
Is it bad I don't really care where my Apple products are made?
Sure I want worker conditions to be better and labor laws, but the United States has plenty of low end/uneducated jobs, our issue is we don't have educated people to fill all our higher end/bachelors + masters jobs.

We are a developed rich nation, we should not still need these manufacturing jobs.
Rating: 2 Votes
7 months ago
Apple please keep it 'designed in California' and 'made in China' :D
Rating: 2 Votes
27 weeks ago

Problem with Asia is there is no regulations. They are the opposite of environmentally friendly. Lots of factories have contaminated surrounding areas (land, water, and air). Have you seen the amount of smog out there? It's worse than that of NJ/NY here in the US.

Even with my prior post, it still doesn't mean manufacturing can't be done in the US. Manufacturing is still happening and continues to do so.

Your post implies it's not going to happen at all and that's wrong. It still does happen and it is possible for more companies to do so. These companies just don't want to do it.

Meanwhile, labor prices overseas are continually increasing too. As a company moves in, they take advantage of their workforce. However, the workforce they employ eventually gets paid, even if small, to survive and grow an economy in that city. As more and more have jobs and flourish, they demand more income.

Lots of companies left other countries because of this. Nike was a prime example.

Even if a company has to increase a person's wage from 50 cents per day to a 100 cents per day, that's a big expense. It becomes a point of, is it really cheaper to manufacturer overseas now? If a product recall happens, that adds to the cost of shipping back and forth.

Sure Apple has a nice profit margin, so a 50 cent wage increase probably won't matter. But there are a lot of smaller companies overseas that sell to Walmart where if their cost increases a nickle, they may have to shut down their operations.

Lots of companies fail to realize the effects of their actions. A quick buck saved can cost multi-millions later.

Build factories in china now - wages increase - build factories in another country - wages increase - the cycle continues but how much $ was saved if you keep building factories, having to move or buy new equipment, spend time hiring a labor force, etc?

The less profitable ones are realizing this and have moved back to their home country as the tax incentives for moving into select metro areas can be more helpful. Kansas City and Austin are two prime examples.


I'm waiting for China and other countries to be unionized. It seems that after Bill Clinton and NAFTA opened Pandora's box, the only way to get work back here is to make it just as expensive everywhere else. And if respect for humanity and the environment is expensive, imagine all of the corporations that have repeatedly raped these third world hell holes having to pay AMERICAN market wages AND having to pay to clean up their messes! :eek:
Rating: 1 Votes

[ Read All Comments ]